Part 2: How media corruption shortchanges the public

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How you can help reduce it

Exclusive by Raïssa Robles

When information that you obtain from mass media like newspapers, radio or TV is slanted a certain way because a politician or a company gave money to make it come out that way, then the public is shortchanged.

Democracy is distorted.

The way it’s supposed to work is that in a democracy, the mass media help the public make sense of what American psychologist William James called this “blooming, buzzing confusion” that is our world.

Before Twitter and Facebook and blogs came along, many Filipinos tracked events in the Philippines through newspapers, TV and radio.

The role of a reporter is to sense changes in what’s happening from day to day and year to year, to notice trends and to report these as accurately as possible. Newspapers, filled with such reports, serve as guides to the public by highlighting what’s important in the placement of the story on the page and the size of the head or title. The most important story — in the judgment of the newspaper’s editors – is always placed above the fold.

When a reporter or editor succumbs to a bribe or when a newspaper starts selling editorial space to hawk a product or a person, then this sabotages the entire concept of what a newspaper is about. The reading public is misled into thinking that something is very important – when in truth it is not. It just looks important because someone paid for it to be so.

The same thing happens when radio and TV sell airtime in such a way that the public is made to think it is listening to news and not to a political advertisement.

When media misleads

Let me illustrate with examples. In Chay Florentino-Hofileña’s book, “News for Sale: The Corruption & Commercialization of the Philippine Media”, she noted the very disturbing trend of radio and TV networks offering multi-million pesos “commercial packages” to political candidates in the 1998, 2001 and 2004 presidential polls.

For instance, Chay quoted veteran ad executive Yolanda Ong as saying that a P20 million package offered to the late presidential candidate Raul Roco by a radio network in the 2004 polls would have provided him not only radio ads but also thrown in three weekly interviews, favorable spot reports and a reporter “embedded” in his campaign. Chay quoted Ong as saying she rejected the deal.

But what’s wrong with that? A radio network is after all a commercial venture and has to earn to remain viable.

The radio ads are not a problem but the add-ons like the embedded reporter and interviews with soft-ball questions are problematic because they blur the distinction between advertising and news reporting.

Such arrangements also place less moneyed candidates at a gross disadvantage. Candidates who may be better-qualified but who don’t have as much money would have less chances of being heard by the public. And that does the voting public a disservice.

In addition, reporters could also be discouraged from digging too deep into the backgrounds of political candidates who have contracted such commercial arrangements with the newspapers, radio and TV networks they work for.

Can the Commission on Elections require both mass media and political candidates to make disclosures of such commercial arrangements as they happen and not wait for months after the elections?

Consumers of news are entitled to know whether they are listening to news or to paid political propaganda.

Another trend that Chay noted was the oftentimes secret commercial contracting of entertainment and lifestyle reporters as well as columnists in order to write favorably about certain political candidates.

We have no law banning such arrangements. But they are highly unethical. The least that contracted reporters can do is to disclose such arrangements. And is this covered by VAT? I wonder. Because every writing assignment I do with local media is covered by VAT.

There is also no law against celebrities endorsing political candidates. But they ought to disclose to their fans how much they were paid for it; if they are doing it out of personal conviction or if it is a purely commercial transaction.

Profiles and features on candidates, their spouses or children are sometimes assigned to reporters without the latter knowing that this is part of the advertising package that a candidate arranged with a newspaper or TV network. I think reporters have the right to know this and should have no restrictions on what pertinent information they can truthfully unearth and report about the candidate . Rival candidates ought to get the same space and treatment so the public can be informed as well about them.

Whenever I write about a candidate I make sure to also find out everything I can about him, especially those parts of his life he has been trying to downplay or conceal – a mistress, ill-gotten wealth, a vice or a previous questionable transaction.

In this connection, let me mention to you an interesting thing about the campaign of Congressman Jack Enrile for senator. He actually began campaigning a year ago last November when he met with some prominent women in media. It’s good that Philippine Daily Inquirer columnist Rina Jimenez-David wrote about the ladies’ luncheon with Enrile. You can read about Enrile’s early wooing of the media by clicking here.

Jack Enrile’s handlers must have told him – don’t deny your shady past but blame it on youthful excesses and say you are now a reformed husband, father and grandfather. By next year, his camp can simply shrug off the same issues as “old hat” and refuse to entertain questions on the matter any further.

I wonder if this tactic will work for Jack Enrile and if media men will have the guts to keep asking Enrile about it and digging up more facts about it.

If you see stories on Enrile and the other senatorial candidates between now and the May elections – especially in the newspapers’ lifestyle and entertainment sections and on magazine covers – please take the time to analyze the stories and see whether these praise the subjects too much. Examine the adjectives used to describe the candidates. See whether the stories give a balanced and fair view of the subjects.

I’m not saying that if such stories come out in these venues you could assume they are paid for. What I’m saying is that politicians will naturally be targeting these venues. It will be a testament to the skill of the editors and writers to portray candidates in such a way that readers gain real insight into their character, and not just publish articles showing off the candidates’ beautiful homes, their possessions, pictures of their families, their dogs or gardens.

Writing about celebrities is very much a part of journalism. Personally, I like reading the in-depth stories of “Yes” magazine, whose editor-in-chief is veteran journalist Jo-Ann Maglipon and whose executive editor is long-time journalist-poet-screenwriter Pete Lacaba.

What do you do when you spot a story in the media that’s worded like a “praise release” for a candidate?

Before the 2010 presidential polls, there was nothing much that ordinary consumers of news could do about propaganda foisted as news on the public.

But now, with the rise of social networks like Facebook and Twitter as well as blogs, you and I can actually have our say on this matter.

Remember it was the netizens in social networking sites who first spotted Senator Vicente Sotto’s plagiarism. And kept spotting it again and again. That encounter with social media flustered Sotto so much he made the additional mistake of revealing the impending Cybercrime Bill, tipping off the public to that outrageous law’s existence

That was merely the initial flexing of netizens’ muscles.

I can hardly wait to see what role the Internet and social media will play in next year’s elections. Will they add to confusion or help bring the voice of the public to the field of mass media?

I foresee people on Facebook and Twitter and commenters on this site looking out for media men and women who have secretly hired out their services to politicians. And of course, there’ll be shady operators on the Internet who will offer their services and media packages to political candidates.

_____________________________________

Related Story

Part 1: A painful topic – media corruption 

185 Responses to “Part 2: How media corruption shortchanges the public”

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  1. 40
    Mel says:

    Learning from the Americans.

    Abby Martin takes a look at America’s history of government infiltration in news media, from the CIA’s 1950s secret cold-war program, dubbed ‘Operation Mockingbird’, through to paid Pentagon online trolls today.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQl9H-gi9NE&feature=player_embedded

  2. 39
    Mariano Renato Pacifico says:

    Why Filipinos cannot tell distortion from daan-matuwid ? Because Filipinos cannot have the facility to know the difference because their only source of MISINFORMATION IS TFC CHANNELS !!!!! And Adarna comics !!!!

    • 39.1
      Mariano Renato Pacifico says:

      Most of all THEY DO NOT GO TO LIBRARIES … they’d rather Facebook and pa-teks-teks …

  3. 38
    fcb328 says:

    Ms. Raissa, now that you opened “a can of worms” (Corruption in the Philippine Media), is there a prevalent “code of silence” in the media community. It is prudent not to name names?
    Or Is this just an inherent gene is the filipino psyche-culture-attitude.
    Can’t the media police itself ? What percentage of the journalists in the Philippine Media are on the take and have integrity-credibility?

    • 38.1
      raissa says:

      I don’t know the percentage that’s on the take.

      I suspect this rises and ebbs.

      The media can police itself if it wants to. The people can do the policing as well.

    • 38.2
      raissa says:

      Yes, there is an informal code of silence – just like in other professions.

      I think it’s a human trait, and not just a Filipino trait.

      I don’t know the percentage of those on the take. The problem is, there are some prominent ones who give the entire profession a bad name.

  4. 37
  5. 36
    Coco says:

    Off topic.

    Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo believes Pablo is “God’s punishment” on Filipinos for even daring to contemplate passage of the RH bill.

    Is this the same God that let perish 2,000,000 Filipino fertilized eggs by lack of implantation yearly ? 500 Pablo deaths versus 2,000,000? Bishop, please enlighten me.

  6. 35
    Mel says:

    When NO to fear, bribery and omissions were a rarity, and lock down to padlock was just the norm to stifle the Freedom of the Press some 30 years ago.

    NEVER FORGET | 30 years after the WE Forum raid, the Philippine press relishes a lesson on freedom

    By: Lourdes M. Fernandez,
    InterAksyon.com
    December 7, 2012 6:00 PM

    MANILA, Philippines – Shortly before noon on December 7, 1982, a team led by Col. Rolando Abadilla, then intelligence chief of the Metrocom, raided the offices of the WE Forum, the trailblazer of the “Mosquito Press” under martial law. The soldiers hauled off voluminous documents, padlocked the printing press and jailed WE Forum publisher-editor Jose G. Burgos Jr., his father Jose Sr., and several columnists and newspaper staffers.

    Two sites were actually raided in what is now simply refered to as the “WE Forum raid”. Both sites were in Quezon City: the home and office of Jose Sr. on No. 19, Road 3, Project 6; and the office and printing site that Jose Jr. leased at Units C and D, RMC Building, Quezon Avenue.

    It was a raid that drew condemnation all over the world, and exposed further the repressive nature of the Marcos regime. But it was also a seminal moment in the Philippine democracy movement, further emboldening a rising army of human rights defenders, and drawing a line behind which the opposition to Marcos – still under military rule – would not move back but only forward.

    Read the rest of the commemorative piece at http://www.interaksyon.com/article/49895/never-forget–30-years-after-the-we-forum-raid-the-philippine-press-relishes-a-lesson-on-freedom

    • 35.1
      raissa says:

      My father was one of the lawyers defending Burgos et al, along with lawyers Joker Arroyo, Rene Saguisag, Jejomar Binay and Martiniano Vivo.

      • 35.1.1
        Mel says:

        I remember those days, I hold your father in good stead.

        I was grateful, I’m appreciative of your efforts through your blog today.

        Makes us all wonder what changes has befallen Joker Arroyo, R Saguisag (Erap’s impeachment lawyer), Jejomar Binay. Anu balita kay Martiniano Vivo?

        Good tidings…

  7. 34
    leona says:

    Nahuli sila sa FB! No question the 4 had almost verbatim writings. Even their denials how it came about are likewise almost the same too! The link is

    http://www.newsbreak.com.ph/

    Mag ingat na kayo! hahaha…

  8. 33
    leona says:

    Off topic…John MacAffee the creator of the anti-virus program in his name, after being denied in Guatemala for political asylum, suddenly got sick…chest pains! Somebody from this country must have called him up what to do! Who? The link

    http://news.yahoo.com/mcafee-hospitalized-being-denied-asylum-221742664.html

    • 33.1
      pinay710 says:

      @mam/sir leona, mula’t sapul ang Pilipino ang nangongopya sa america, ngayon isang americano ang nangopya ng systema ng mga Pilipinong opisyal pagnahuhuli. ang kaibahan po nayan hindi MANUAL WHEELCHAIR ANG GAGAMITIN NI MCAFEE, MOTORIZED PO. saka nasa ibang bansa sya. heheheeh siguro po napanood nya kung paano nakawheel chair si gma at morato.

  9. 32
    docbebot says:

    Just read at Interaksyon Alex Magno, former DBP director, charged by the Ombudsman.

  10. 31
    jeproks2002 says:

    Media corruption is worst when others in media turn a blind eye to what their corrupt colleagues are doing. A sin of omission if you will. I am glad Ms. Raissa has raised this issue when others would rather brush it off. I have yet to hear or read any comment by the four columnists regarding their curiously similar “writing styles”. Perhaps they think this is not a big deal and hope this thing will just go away.

    The Maguindanao massacre is condemnable and must not happen again. This is a sensitive matter but I have to ask. I find it curious why so many media people were there. Could they have been paid too? If so, how much? Is this payment to cover a media event an accepted practice? I know lawyers and their legal teams are paid for their legal services during elections. Are media practitioners paid fees also by the candidates to report?

    • 31.1
      Johnny Lin says:

      Those 4 are all corrupt, bet the house on that.

      Silence is golden!
      Before everybody was in the mood to talk. Suddenly everyone has sealed lips.
      1. Arroyos
      2. Media- 4 columnists
      3. Genuino and Soriano
      4. Morato and PCSO officials
      5. Latest is PSC comission-er Alfredo Po who was entrapped recently with bribery by NBI

      He he he

    • 31.2
      Aurora pascua says:

      Very good and straight to the point of questioning the media ? Why ?

  11. 30
    Joe America says:

    Interesting commentary.

    I rather think that LIFE is a corruption, the art of wandering amongst half-truths and self-justifications and erroneous or incomplete information. The internet makes things happen even faster, which can be bad (biased information from paid hacks strewn across the ether) or good (the public eyeballing and outing bad behavior). Plus, the internet rather redefines privacy and those who like to be truly private ought not let Google enter their lives, not to mention the cookie monsters.

    I think that politics and press have always been strange bedfellows, and now the internet simply allows us to see it more clearly. I think trends are up, not down.

  12. 29
    Mel says:

    Media corruption shortchanges the public? What about ““The Omissions of “Mainstream” Journalism: “History in the Un-Making”“?

    “Project Censored: Important stories unreported or suppressed by the media most Americans watch or read.”


    For 36 years, Project Censored, based in California, has documented critically important stories unreported or suppressed by the media most Americans watch or read. This year’s report is Censored 2013: Dispatches from the media revolution by Mickey Huff and Andy Lee Roth (Seven Stories Press). They describe the omissions of “mainstreamjournalism as “history in the un-making”. Unlike Leveson, their investigation demonstrates the sham of a system claiming to be free.

    Source: www globalresearch ca ““The Omissions of “Mainstream” Journalism: “History in the Un-Making”

  13. 28
    emong says:

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=556468304378605&set=vb.100000463213409&type=2&theater

    This should be the kind of projects our government and private companies should have for our hero OFWs… nakakaiyak…. pero nakaktaba ng puso.. :) Merry X’mas to all!

    • 28.1
      raissa says:

      I like the thought behind it but it is, in the end, a commercial for the product.

    • 28.2
      leona says:

      @emong…walang biro…pag may sarap na lechon, umi-iyak ako pag ‘di ko ma balatan yan! Nakaka iyak talaga! Btw, don’t get to drinking the product, WATER is for our human body and not that! Of course, coffee has water mixed in it!

    • 28.3
      pinay710 says:

      @emong, pinaiyak mo ako ha. salamat. maligayang pasko din sa inyong lahat!!!

    • 28.4
      davide says:

      maski commercial at least it made lots of people happy. in a way may even though its a commercial for Coke, may napaligaya naman those who were lucky to have been chosen. they should do that very often, christmas, thanksgiving, all souls day etc.

      very touching maski ang motiff is commercial. makalipay ug makahilak ang paglantaw sa video.

  14. 27
    upright bike says:

    If i wrote an article about a bridge and its benefits to the general public and the local government or any government agency treated me to a lunch and gave me P 1,000 for my taxi fare, am I corrupt?

    Or should I exercise more diligence and investigate if the bridge has any structural defect, or should I investigate who the the contractor was, or is the bridge really necessary?

    These questions will highlight the gray area shrouding the issue of media corruption. Every story is the product a reporter’s efforts and his judgement call.

    It is not very easy to tag a journalist corrupt for attending a luncheon dinner hosted by a government official or an agency.

    As they say. you write a story as you see it.

    • 27.1
      springwoodman says:

      IMHO, yes you are. Not a gray area at all.

      • 27.1.1
        Victin Luz says:

        I agree with@springwoodman……exercise a positive duty enjoined to every journalist @ upright bike……discern or gather facts before you start writing. Casual lunch together with the employees of the government host could be acceptable especially if the venue is within their office but accepting a Taxi Fare will never be tollerated.

        Hatid sundo ng service vehicle nila ay pupwede pa , but your positive duty as a journalist is whatever ” NO STRING ATTACH ” just Attack if there are anomalies .

    • 27.2
      Alan says:

      If you are going to write about the benefits of a bridge, have a lunch with govt officials at their expense and receive taxi fare to boot, you may as well CONTRACT to write the press release for the agency, because you’re not practicing journalism, you’re doing PR.

      For me having a free lunch is borderline excusable (less so if you’re the only one attending) but receiving “taxi fare” is outright corruption. How many times in my career has someone waved a bulging envelope in front of me after a press event while saying “pang taxi” or “pang meryenda” — I have never accepted.

      If I were the one doing the story you’re talking about I’d start by researching everything I can about the bridge through public records and sources and officials, follow that up by interviewing people living nearby and taking pictures of the bridge, talking to specialists, looking over what I have and then going back to the officials and specialists with whatever new questions I’d have formulated during the entire process. Whatever I end up with will be what will shape my story.

      Everyone knows most journalists aren’t paid well, but that’s the nature of the job. If you can’t live within this realization then get out and be a PR. But if you’re using the title of “journalist” as a cover for PR, then you are a problem to the profession.

    • 27.3
      leona says:

      @upright bike…what do you say to that “As they say you write a story as you see it”? That’s it? Or it should say “One write a story as one see P1,000.00 to it?”

      For just attending a luncheon dinner as you said it, it is easy to say there is no corruption yet.

      Making further examinations and investigation on that bridge is the appropriate thing to do IF or WHEN one is a journalist who wrote something about the bridge. Since you accepted the P1000 already, use it to make the further investigation and with GUTS revised your news report to say that bridge is DANGEROUS pala! And “bite the bullet” as Raissa says.

      There is no truth about a GRAY AREA when truth reporting is the goal. It is only a human brain that has a color of it…gray.

      Btw, be very careful riding the bike…don’t run along gray areas or you could get hurt on the bike lanes. Have a nice day bike rider!

    • 27.4
  15. 26
    andrew lim says:

    A BIT OF GOOD NEWS

    I’ve been studying Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index 2012 for some time now. Last year, the Philippines got a ranking of no. 129 out of 182 countries. This year, it got a ranking of 105 out of 176 countries evaluated.

    SOME CAVEATS:

    1. The index is a composite, using a combination of surveys and assesments of corruption collected by several reputable institutions. (from the website) In the Philippines, a total of 9 surveys were used.

    2. Since corruption is a behavior not easily measured, and becomes known only after a scandal breaks or an investigation has started, the best way to measure it is through assessments of those in a position to do so.

    3. You cannot compare the rankings over time because the methodology is not strictly similar every year- the number and kind of surveys used. So you cannot say the new ranking of 105 for the Phils is an improvement over the 129 it got last year. The methodology will become standardized in the coming years, allowing a comparison over time.

    4. What is a cause for some joy is the relative position of the Phils since it is now closer to the middle than before. So you can argue that yes, corruption levels as perceived by survey respondents has improved. You can infer that Pnoy’s anti-corruption drive has made some headway.

    5. The CPI is now getting more attention and companies making investments do look at it more intensely now.

    Ituloy ang laban sa korapsyon!

    @ Raissa, I posted something on Gil Cabacungan’s PDI article on Jackie Enrile’s interview. It got lost.

    • 26.1
      yeheywater says:

      The Link below must be the one andrew lim is talking about…

      http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/318521/enrile-gives-up-monument-to-self-now-an-eyesore-on-ayala-avenue

      or the one before, which is at # 6.1, this page.

      Try also reading Raissa’s link…and few of its comments.

      “about Enrile’s early wooing of the media by clicking here”

      • 26.1.1
        Johnny Lin says:

        This is the second time in two consecutive months Gil Cabacungan wrote something POSITIVE for Jackie Enrile.

        Raissa wrote about this kind of reporting based on the book of Hofilena in her blog above.

        The third time we read another feature on Jackie by Gil, telltale sign is confirmed.

        Cant blame to look for extra income for Christmas season needs heavy expenses.
        Sandy Romualdez might need to deliver another scathing speech on another employee.
        Calling Media censors!

        He he he.

        • 26.1.1.1
          raissa says:

          It’s possible that Gil wrote about Enrile because he makes good copy at this point – being the son of the Senate President and running for the Senate himself.

          As a personal disclosure, I was the one who first hired and trained Gil in Business Star of The Star Group. He’s mainly a business writer who switched to writing on politics.

          I would like to see more of Gil’s writings on Enrile.

          • 26.1.1.1.1
            Johnny Lin says:

            Everything is possible. Equal distribution of write ups among candidates exude fairness.

            Marites Vitug wrote about gray areas. Two positive articles less than one month apart is quite revealing. In between no other prominent senatorial candidates had positive features. Astonishing assignment!

            Aside from Enrile the other legitimate sons running for senators are Angara and Pimentel. Or controversial leftists, Hontiveros and Casino or that independent Hagedorn who had a colorful past life.

            You might have trained him, but he is not a fruit, just a grafted tree. Not all grafted trees successfully bear sweet fruits. From business to politics, hmmm!

            Peanut butter is spread evenly, lumping it becomes expensive butterfinger.

            Just a thought. Precaution is prevention.

          • 26.1.1.1.2
            parengtony says:

            I found this particular article quite interesting and also very well written. All three property developments mentioned have always been arousing my curiosity – so huge yet so “bitin”, all of them.

            Also, I could not see any obvious positive slant in favor of either jackie or his dad to warrant the tag “PR work” (as explained by Alan) instead of a journalistic one.

            • springwoodman says:

              “Any publicity is good publicity.”

            • jeproks2002 says:

              the slant i see is the subliminal reference to jackie’s supposed business acumen. it would seem he had a better perspective than his shrewd father when he wanted to invest in real property in Laguna. the message could be that the son can be better than the father.

              • Johnny Lin says:

                First article portrayed Jackie as:
                1. Youth was reason of recklessness
                2. He was actually the victim of his dad’ s position
                3. He is areform person and godly

                Second article portrayed him as:
                1. Visionary
                2. Obedient loving son
                3. Wisest in the family with managerial skill

                Watch out for coming features dealing with his compassion, kindness, honesty, integrity, government service, responsible parent, peace loving person and incorruptibility.

                Before Marcos switched to Nacionalista party personal features of him were released by cooperating newspaper, Manila Chronicle owned by Lopezes eventually Fernando Lopez was his VP. Positive features included circumstances of his innocence in the killing of Nalundasan, scholastic honors and hardships, war exploits(courage and valor), attributes( kind and compassionate) charisma(how he wooed Imelda) and a doting father, vision of a better Philippines and capabilities.

                Beat student of Marcos is named Juan Ponce Entile
                Coincidence?

              • Rolly says:

                @parengtony @jeproks2002

                Propaganda…that’s the name of the game. They want to show to madlang people that they are clean, that their ill-gotten wealth is not that much to finish the project. I would like to think though, that Enrile is wealthier than Danding Cojuangco, given the fact that Enrile had the favor of Marcos in the early days of martial law.

                Kung si Marcos merong $15B (gold excluded), payat kay Enrile ang 2 bilyong dolyar..

                Enrile headed the Philippine Coconut Authority that subsequently bought 72 % of Cocobank. As of today, Cocobank, AKA, UCPB is one of top 20 banks in the Philippines. source: Wikipedia

                If my memory serves me right, Danding and Enrile were the co-owners of the Republic Planters Bank in the early 80′s (could not find much reference to this).

              • Rene-Ipil says:

                Jeproks@26.1

                The slant I see, aside from the purported good business acumen of Jackie, is the exposure of the huge value of the property nowadays which was purportedly acquired in 1987. It insinuates that the property was “purchased” at a much smaller amount 25 years ago but is now worth more than a billion pesos. So that the people would think that JPE is really big time now.

                But I think the Ayala property is just the tip of the iceberg insofar as true wealth of Enrile is concerned. He was the next most powerful man in the Philippines during martial law and I believe also that his wealth is topped by Marcos’ only. What we are “allowed” to see is the Ayala and JAKA properties only.

    • 26.2
      leona says:

      @andrew lim…Tama si Raissa. And the Jack article is barya…shortchanging or it is mute! Kailangan yun mahirap ma sukli-an! It is not loud or thunderous. Sa Sabung…tiyope!

  16. 25
    curveball says:

    kaya ang mga politiko ay malapit sa media kasi dito sila magiging effective. tulad ng mga tao sa probinsya at baryo halimbawa, bago pipili ng iboboto syempre makikinig muna sa mga sinasabi ng announcer sa radyo. magbabasa ng mga dyaryo at artikulo ng mga manunulat. dahil sa hindi naman nila personal na kilala silang lahat. at kung ano ang mas nakararami at mas madalas na mabasa at marining na pangalan ay yun ang magiging gabay sa iboboto nila. kaya swerte na kung malaki an gpondo ng politiko para araw araw na may magandang isusulat sa kanya o kwento tungkol sa kanya. at malas ang politiko na walang press release dahil di sya maalala… sino sya???? talo na uli ang mga taong kahit na may malinis na puso sa serbisyo pero walang pera pambili ng “airtime at space”.
    ito ang malungkot na katotohanan sa mahal ko bansa.

  17. 24
    Jett Rink says:

    media can also downplay some issues and make people forget them, like the West Tower pipeline fiasco. protecting FPIC and its owners.

  18. 23
    Monty says:

    Copied from Neal Cruz’s article in the Inquirer “Let’s look at the charges raised against Okada by some lawmakers who had allied themselves with Wynn. The first salvo, fired four or five months ago, claimed Okada spent $110,000 to billet the present Pagcor chair and his predecessor in Macau. That attack fizzled out because people naturally asked: Why raise the issue only now?
    Then came the accusation that Okada bribed then Pagcor consultant Rodolfo Soriano $5 million to get a license to operate a casino in Entertainment City. There is also the claimed payment of an additional $10 million to Soriano that never was, but was made to look in media like it actually happened.”

    Copied from Ducky Paredes’ article in Malaya “In his first salvo from four or five months ago, Wynn claimed Okada improperly spent $110,000 to billet the present Philippine and Korean gaming officials in Macau. (This was Wynn’s excuse for redeeming Okuda’s 20% share in Wynn’s Resorts at only $1.9 billion, a 30% discount at market value!. Okuda is still fighting for full payment!)

    That attack fizzled out in the Philippines because people naturally posed the question, why raise the issue only now? Besides, the practice of ostentatious digs given free to visiting firemen is common practice in the Casino business.

    Then came the accusation that Okada bribed former Pagcor consultant Rodolfo Soriano $5 million to get a license to operate a casino at the Entertainment City in Pasay. There’s also the claimed payment of $10 million to Soriano that never was but was made to look in media like it happened. In fact, according to a recent Reuters story, Soriano’s take has already been estimated to have exceeded $30 million and counting.”

    This is way to much!! Corrupt na tamad pa! They didn’t even change the prepared position paper made by whoever bribed them.

    • 23.1
      Sarah says:

      I’m not surprised. Angela Casauay from Rappler also had an article which cited 4 columnists for having similar articles on the sin tax. What a waste of column space.

  19. 22
    andrew lim says:

    Off-topic, on RH:

    To the casual observer, one of the more substantial arguments by the anti-RH camp is the issue of their taxes being used for a purpose that offends their religious beliefs.

    According to them, it is not acceptable for the govt to use taxpayers’ money for contraceptives, etc because it is against their religion.

    HOW TO REFUTE THIS

    Having an economics background, this is how you counter this: Public money has no religious face. Once your taxes enter the treasury, it loses its religious character. The govt exists for all, not just Catholics. No religious group can compel a govt to make a move that favors them alone. The Catholic church does not own the Philippine Republic.

    If you follow the logic of their argument, you will be led to ridiculous situations:

    Can Moslems ask for a stop to the Dept of Agriculture’s support of hog-raisers because pigs offend them?

    Can a pacifist group (those who abhor violence in any form, even self-defense and law enforcement) now have a tax deduction equal to the amount that goes to the DND, AFP, PNP because the purchase of guns and bullets offend them?

    Preposterous.

    Given that you disagree with a govt’s policies, then your recourse is to elect one that you agree with.

    • 22.1
      baycas says:

      The State is mandated by the Constitution NOT to favor or disfavor any religion.

      This is the principle of “The Separation of Church and State“. The State is being the one ordered.

      And just to remind everyone, the Church referred here is NOT confined to the Catholic Church.

      • 22.1.1
        yeheywater says:

        The separation of Church and State is oftentimes misquoted and misused by the churches in their favor.

        The Catholic Church quotation of “taxpayers money” implies that they are paying taxes themselves.

    • 22.2
      et says:

      “Loss of religious character” is just palusot the state uses to avoid entanglements. In the end, every taxpayer knows that “this is where your taxes go,” no matter what the economists tell him.

      “No religious group can compel a govt…” But can government compel members of religious groups to act contrary to their beliefs? What about the constitutional guarantee that the free exercise and enjoyment of religious profession and worship shall forever be allowed?

      On the hypothetical Moslems asking the DA to stop supporting hog-raisers: Is it a correct analogy to raise a dietary restriction to the same level as protecting the unborn? Also, maybe the reason that Moslems have not complained is because they can easily refrain from eating pork. Would it be as easy for Catholics to stop abortifacients from being handed out at the health centers?

      On the pacifist group: is there an existing world religion for this? How many Filipino citizens are bona fide members? Should we be exercising our imaginations to the extreme just to come out with preposterous examples?

      It’s easy to say that you should elect a government that you agree with, but has this issue been raised as part of the candidates’ platforms before? Would there be any candidate that you would agree with completely? If not, then the best recourse would be to argue against those policies that you disagree with, wouldn’t it? (Because not voting for that candidate in a later election would be too late to address the issue at hand.)

      • 22.2.1
        andrew lim says:

        Thanks for the intelligent comments. My responses:

        1. Separation of church and state is very clear as @baycas above posted. It is not “palusot.” Your money cannot retain a religious identity when you pay it as taxes.

        2. Who’s compelling whom to use contraceptives?

        3. I raised the Moslem (you can include Hindus, too for cattle) and pacifists as examples to show the absurdity of that anti-RH argument. Because when you enact laws, you anticipate the possible scenarios that may arise. In this case, allowing a religious group (RCC) to ban/approve govt policies based on its beliefs runs counter to church/state separation. (Rep Garcia attempted it in his killer amendment )

        Who’s to say if a dietary restriction is of lesser or greater or equal importance to your religious objection to RH? These are all religious beliefs.

        Disagreeing like what you are doing right now is guaranteed by the Constitution. And so is a rebuttal of it like what I just wrote.

        • 22.2.1.1
          et says:

          Thanks, too, for your reply. My follow-on responses:

          1. Semantics does not change the fact of where the tax money came from. It only insulates the state from possible legal entanglement. The devout, moral Catholic could still see his tax money being used for the purchase of possible abortifacients. (To Victin Luz: please note that some contraceptives can be considered abortifacients, e.g. those that prevent implantation.)

          2. In light of #1 above, the state would be compelling Catholics to support the distribution of possible abortifacients.

          3. Indeed, the possible consequences should be examined. However, the examples raised are not valid: Moslems and Hindus can simply avoid eating the offensive foods; and there doesn’t seem to be any organized religion of the pacifist group with any significant numbers. These straw men do not equate with the potentially millions of Catholics whose rights could be affected when the state uses their tax money for purposes that go against their religion.

          I compared the dietary restriction to the right of the unborn, not just a religious belief. Does the right of the unborn belong in the realm of religion only?

          Rational argument and counter-argument are of course, the best recourse, which is why I wonder what was the purpose of your previous statement: “then your recourse is to elect one [govt] that you agree with”. I would not want to believe that you were, in effect, telling people who disagree to stop arguing and just not vote for them again, but this is what statement seems to imply.

          The questions raised in the first reply remain unanswered.

          • 22.2.1.1.1
            springwoodman says:

            1. State money is State money. It is not Catholic money or Protestant money or Muslim money. It is not semantics.

            2. The State will allocate funds for the common good.

            3. What rights of Catholics are being affected by the RH Bill?

            4. Do Catholics have greater rights than other Filipino citizens?

            • et says:

              1. State money is taxpayers’ money as we are reminded that “This is where your taxes go.”.

              2. The state should ensure that no citizens’s rights are violated when allocating funds to its projects.

              3. The Catholic citizen’s right to free exercise of his religion will be affected when his taxes are used to procure and distribute possible abortifacients.

              Also, the state will violate its policy of protecting the life of the unborn from conception.

              4. Catholics have equal rights as other Filipino citizens. If a conflict between these rights seem to exist in the proposed law as is implied by your question, then isn’t that an indication that it needs to be corrected?

              • springwoodman says:

                1. Agree. It is not Catholic money.
                2. As a general rule, yes. Specifically, no.
                3. Catholics can choose not to avail of benefits provided by the State.
                3.1 What is the ethical position of the Church between the rights of a mother and the unborn child?
                3.2 What is the ethical position of the Church between overpopulation and the quality of life?
                3.3 The State is not proposing abortion. Stop peddling that myth.
                4. Remember, the common good is the rule. The law cannot satisfy everybody.
                4.1 Why do Catholics have this sense of entitlement? That everything must be according to their beliefs?

              • Victin Luz says:

                @ET……. Ha ha that is why in the RH BILL , health centers will educate you the correct procedure when to USE contraceptives and a thorough check up/rigid examination when you have done sex on the first time without contraceptive and asking to take contraceptive before second encounter ( of course you have to tell the truth what happen during your first time )

                A contraceptives taken for the first time before sex will prevent only the UNIFICATION of sperm and egg cells,,, you are not aborting anything because there is no implantation yet @ET………. Medicines taken when there was already a UNIFICATION of S & E cells ” may implantation na iyan sa uterus ” some medicines are abortifacient. CORTAL and other ordinary medicines when taken overdosage it became abortifacient.

                Kaya ko sinasabi na ” it might be considered as abortifacients ” Because other ordinary medicines especially a certain medicine for ULCER when taken overdosage if you are pregnant it can abort your baby.

                But contraceptives to be produce upon the approval of RH BILL must be 100% not abortifacients. Be as it may still it should be introduce to woman’s body before sexual intercourse , to be safe.

          • 22.2.1.1.2
            Victin Luz says:

            @ET……..the purpose of the RH BILL is to teach partners/couples to use contraceptives BEFORE Conception meaning contraceptives used will prevent the unification of sperm and egg cells so no implantation yet or no early stage of pregnancy.

            Contraceptives used after conception means contraceptives as you said will become abortifacient . But as long as contraceptives are utilize before human life begins , that is before conception or taken before SEXUAL INTERCOURSE It will/must not be abortifacient.

            I disagree with you @ET……..we will not be talking here of unborn child, none at all.

            • Victin Luz says:

              If you are talking now about abortion @ET……… RH BILL is also against abortion, so that dietary restriction to the right of the unborn is of no moment here @ET…… Of course if you do a sexual intercourse during your fertility period FIRST without contraceptive then RH BILL will prevent you in using/taking a contraceptive on SECOND time or THIRD time because a UNIFICATION of egg and sperm might be successful during you FIRST time does such contraceptives might be considered as abortifacients.

              So we have to argue now that those opposed to the RH BILL ( Catholics, cngressmen, senators and etc. ) were wrong and come election time we will not vote those who are against the RH BILL.

              • Victin Luz says:

                @ET…….how would the state compell the Catholics to support the distribution of possible abortifacients…….. HOW @ ET…… Kindly explain to us how……. Palagay ko ay hindi mo binabasa ang nasa loob ng RH BILL , Walang pilitan iyan sa pagpunta, paghingi at paggamit ng Contraceptives….. Kung ayaw mo wag mo…….. But to those who are willing to slow down pregnancy whether rich or poor mother ,the corresponding Health Centers will teach and give you the procedure in consuming contraceptives.

              • et says:

                To Victin Luz: Do we have a definitive classification of contraceptives whether they are abortifacients or not? How will the list of allowed contraceptives be decided upon? Will it be a big concern for you if abortifacients get included in the list?

              • et says:

                To Victin Luz

                How will the RH Bill “prevent you in using/taking a contraceptive on SECOND time or THIRD time”?

          • 22.2.1.1.3
            andrew lim says:

            @et

            We wont get any further on this conversation because of your beliefs that taxpayer money retains a religious or Catholic identity in your case. As @springwoodman comments below, state money is not Catholic money or Mustlim money. It’s not yours anymore when you pay it.

            By the same token, Catholics can just not partake of contraceptives offered in health centers, if it offends them. But since not everyone is Catholic, why prevent others from having the opportunity to use them by preventing passage of the bill?

            The “right of the unborn” is not a striclty defined legal precept. It will have to brought to the SC for a definitive answer. Your religious group does have a stand on that, but not everyone shares that.

            Lastly, I was operating under the scenario in which the bill has been passed – the alternative, among others, is for your group to elect officials that share your views. Or challenge it in the courts.

            • et says:

              To andrew lim

              The restriction on Catholics is not just on the use of contraceptives. Catholics are also expected to view abortion as abhorrent, which is what would be happening if abortifacients are somehow included in the list of contraceptives handed out at the health centers.

              The state policy on the unborn is clear: The state shall protect the life of the unborn from conception (equally with the mother). Why should the SC have to rule on this?

              • springwoodman says:

                @et

                You keep quoting the Constitution on protecting the life of the unborn.

                No where do you mention the doctrine of the separation of Church and State. I wonder why.

              • et says:

                To springwoodman

                Separation of Church and State works both ways, so the State should not interfere with the free practice of the citizens’ religious beliefs, which could be the case if it compels citizens to pay taxes for use in ways that would be contrary to their beliefs.

                In #3 above, your response was to ask about the ethical views of the Catholic church. However, the question was about what rights of the citizen who happens to be Catholic are being affected. In any case, since it is the State that is coming up with the law, then it should be scrutinized to see if it could affect basic human rights, and if inadvertently, it might be allowing abortifacient drugs even if it is stating otherwise.

                In #4 above, the law not pleasing everybody is OK, but the law should take care not to affect the rights of the citizens. It is not a sense of entitlement, it could just be an awareness of one’s basic rights.

      • 22.2.2
        Victin Luz says:

        Yes, @et…… Argue now the govt. policies you disagree with and at the same time by not voting candidates whose platforms are objectionable at your end, come election time.

        Please just a reminder the RH BILL contraceptives/pills are not abortifacients .

      • 22.2.3
        Victin Luz says:

        @ET …….ganito para maliwanagan mo. Halimbawa 10 classes of contraceptives are allowed to be utilized on RH BILL and all the ten will prevent the UNIFICATION of S & E cells, …..pero ang 2 or dalawang contraceptives will not only prevent the unification but also abortifacients nga , nakalusut, pinalusut ng Drug Company, ngayon kung gagamitin man ng isang ginang ano man sa 2 abortifacient ,…..as long as they will consume that contraceptives before sexual intercourse ,,…..ay ano naman ang ilalaglag mo ay wala pa namang implantation or earlynstage of pregnancy,,……ang linaw @ET…my example is only to prevent the unification of S & E cells ( science di ba )

        • 22.2.3.1
          et says:

          To Victin Luz

          So you are OK with the possible/probable misuse of the 2 abortifacients? In effect, magiging available yung mga pampalaglag from the Health Centers?

          • 22.2.3.1.1
            Victin Luz says:

            @ @ET………ganito ang sinasabi ko @ET…….after the approval of RH BILL we spicifically our GOVERNMENT, DOH or any attached agencies thereat MUST exercise their POLICE POWER in monitoring the production of 100% non abortifacient contraceptives. …………in the event that for example 1 or 2 contraceptives were produced and delivered in Health Centers……..nakalusut, pinalusut, hindi nakita while mixing certain percentage % components of the contraceptives at naging abortifacient nga bukod sa it will not only prevent the UNIFICATION of the S & E cells,…… As long that these nakalusut na abortifacient pill are taken or consumed before conception , wala ka namang ilalag e diba at wala ka pa namang ilinalaglag @ET…..unang encounter bago mag sex ha.

            • Victin Luz says:

              Misused….. Hindi pwede iyan @ET…..ang health centers nga ang nagtuturo sa inyo na wag mag misused… Basta gamitin bago mag sex sa unang pagkakataon, at Kung kailangan gamitin afterwards araw araw na consuming para any sex thereafter the s and e will not unite, gawin nyo.

  20. 21
    andrew lim says:

    Just want to share this article written by Gil Cabacungan in the PDI, Dec 5, 2012:

    http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/318521/enrile-gives-up-monument-to-self-now-an-eyesore-on-ayala-avenue

    It’s about Jackie telling the story of their white elephant building in Ayala, missed opportunities, and family disagreements.

    Now, what could this story accomplish?

    1. That the Enriles are human and normal – they have disagreements and make mistakes.

    2. Make you forget that Jackie has no credential to be a Senator, other than being a son of his father.

    Could this be a sample of slanted journalism? You decide.

    If I am mistaken, then that failed monument is a fitting description of Enrile’s poltical career – a grotesque attempt at vanity, and a politics wanting in ideals and principles.

  21. 20
    docbebot says:

    Why did a Lopez publish Enrile’s memoir?

  22. 19
    Martial Bonifacio says:

    Maam raissa i hope you will allow me to post this link since it provides a picture of a “common poster area” that can be adopted by the PH government (comelec).

    http://news.yahoo.com/japan-campaign-opens-focus-economy-nukes-090357476.html

    We have something similar here in SoCal na ginagamit every election day ng hindi nakakalat kung saan saan ang mga itsura ng mga politiko. I hope this will reach the government & MMDA ng hindi parating malaki ang gastos sa paglilinis ng kalye during and after the 2013 election.

  23. 18
    manuelbuencamino says:

    Raissa,

    1. How are those broadsheets without any readership to speak of able to keep publishing? What or who keeps them afloat?

    2. Why is it okay for businessmen or corporations who do business with the government or own public utilities to also own/operate print or broadcast media?

    3. We saw it during Estrada’s and Arroyo’s terms: cronies buying newspapers and turning them into pro administration propaganda outlets. Is this not a form of corruption in media also? And way back when, we saw how the Lopezes used their media as a weapon in their feud with Marcos.

    4. It’s not cheap to own a newspaper or a broadcast medium. And it has to make money. How does media stay independent of its owners and the wishes of advertisers?

    • 18.1
      Alan says:

      (1) Philippine newspapers are unique in that most of them are not published for profit. Most papers are publlished for political reasons (years back, by Marcos cronies and taipans) — because it’s prestigious for a businessman to have a media outfit, or as “insurance” in the publicity game, or as a weapon for attacking enemies and defending friends and interests. Because these papers aren’t published with making profit in mind, the goal is to just minimize losses and to that sort of mindset, giving higher pay to journalists doesn’t figure very prominently
      (2) Because there are no laws against it. There’s a law against foreign ownership of the press and supposedly against “monopoly” (trimedia)
      (3) Yep.
      (4) Some manage. As for the others…well you can judge by the content and standards or lack thereof

  24. 17
    Tomas Gomez III says:

    Please see my comments on the National Press Club, in response to gayyem, Raissa and JJ…..at the very bottom of #1. Maybe Johnny Lin, leona, Andrew Lim, et al…may have some remembrances, too and their valued thoughts, as well. damo nga salamat.

    • 17.1
      andrew lim says:

      @Tomas Gomez III

      Buddy,

      Im not a professional journalist, and I’m not that old to remember that building. :)

      But I do remember the value of an NPC election- holding it in a building with a back entrance enabled Satur Ocampo to escape while voting. ha ha ha ha

      (I am not endorsing the extreme left here. I reject their brand of politics.)

    • 17.2
      Johnny Lin says:

      Buddy

      Wow, NPC member 1957, when I was still innocent who Magsaysay was.
      What I remember was MOPC looking down at their colleagues in NPC, partying at Maharlika pavillion across Intramuros. NPC members hang around outside the grounds of the Round Table while MOPC members gather inside the Front Page across US Embassy.

      At that time there was Roces Manila Times, Hans Menzi Manila Bulletin and Lopez Manila Chronicle, the latter two based in Intramuros including NPC building.

      There was also then Press Photographers of the Philippines with Honesto Vitug as president and Cynthia Ugalde as Miss PPP

      Now, there is National Union of Journalists of the Philippines, NUJP, another press organization. Must be disgruntled members of NPC.

      Like Andrew I am not a journalist either but remember how honest, credible and dignified members of the press then riding mass transportation on a daily basis.

      Now, Pajeros and Toyotas are natural gifts.

      He he he

    • 17.3
      leona says:

      @Tomas…re that NPC bldg…unused for quite sometime, isn’t it? Is it already a sign of a long ago …it’s death? I mean, the NPC is dead, isn’t it? But the reason it was supposedly created, for MEDIA or the human beings -JOURNALISTS, are still alive, isn’t it? Only that with NPC and it’s building [unused now for its lofty purpose] not anymore functioning as it should, MEDIA or journalists have been “released” to whatever fate that will lead them/it to. It is imploding or has it imploded? The former is taking place. The latter is still to be seen.

      Without something like the NPC [ should be existing as a mandatory legal entity ] Media people are on the loose! A void is created. The Media people or the people at large cannot fill this void. It’s an empty something inconsistent with its existence. Is “is not.” Void. Is not “is.”

      This topic re Media and the actions of journalists, will soon, very soon, implode as I said here. “It” or “is not” will cease for all good intents and purposes. Only for the the worst or bad it will be! The chain reaction, to what it is directed to, living in democracy, will obviously follow, cease also. A necessary consequence. Not noble or lofty anymore! Is it because of MONEY? A greed for it? Principally, yes.

      People or the sovereign might of the land must have some legal body to help and nurture the Media and the journalists as a legal body organization. Without such a body, it is free wheeling to all directions without regulation and policing. A detriment to the news necessary for the people as sovereign. We have a situation of “Blind, Deaf and Dumb” atmosphere.

      I hope for a body like NPC but created by law for the purpose or any other but not to have an unintended implosion and be useless. We can write diverse things here, do a lot of reading and opinionating, etc. Without an NPC legal body, Media is at it’s worst and will be more of it in the long run of everyone’s life. A body for it and breathing life to it is needed. A form for it. Now, it’s not there or it’s seems it is there. Which? It is not anywhere!

      We, the people should do this if we want news reporting, etc. be at par. Honest, truthful and not corrupt. My message to the corrupt Media people: You are creating a void you cannot fill.

      The country needs you. The people needs you. Why not take the call? The good challenge? You believe in the word “worth.” Are you worth it? Only you can answer.

    • 17.4
      leona says:

      @Tomas….sorry, I have never been inside of the NPC bldg and I don’t like to. Why? I might have hairs standing feeling and seeing there are GHOSTS WRITERS there! …typing sounds on their Underwoods, Olivettis, Olympias, IBMs, keyboards! Btw, mayroon ba? Kwento mo por favor!

      • 17.4.1
        Tomas Gomez III says:

        The typing clickety-clack sounds from manual writing machines and teleprinters were not audible….these were in a couple of offices of news agencies renting spaces in the lower floors. A good part of the building was leased space. The venue for social/professional interaction was the top floor which had a restaurant (good cuisine, too!) and a well-stocked bar overlooking the Pasig River with the prominent Binondo business edifices right across and the Jones Bridge to the right. The regulars hang around the bar to unwind. That is also where the Botong mural was displayed. As I recall, the elevator was on the east side of the building with the stairs going around the elevator shaft’s housing. I must visit the place for a look see and update, next time I visit. I also wonder if it is still operating!!! There are now so many “kapihans” or lunch cum discussions hosted in several hotels. This regular events are news gathering, news creating and political gossip sources all rolled into one. Once upon a time, the NPC was the venue for very important press conferences that needed a more legitimate and professionally convenient venue.

  25. 16
    leona says:

    Raissa says being a life-time member of NPC, she hasn’t attended any elections for years now. @gayyem says NPC hasn’t been heard of since specially after the Maguindanao massacre. For good reasons surely, NPC is not anymore doing any “police work or regulating and championing” journalists!

    Thus, Raissa’s article here hits the nail on the head! Media corruption! Democracy in corruption [as one says here]. So, our society, with Media in this situation, is in total corruptions. Name it, under the sun and the moon, all over corruption! Even with some of our religious personalities.

    Media for people is a source of confidence and trust. Sovereignty resides in the people. If people are receiving false and lies from many corrupt media people, from newspapers, TVs shows, radios, etc., it must be so widespread to have such false and lies swallowed by many of the people.

    Thus, many false and lying candidates are elected. Many elected officials are lying and misleading the many people. Because of many Media corrupt people! Where will the people get such news of confidence and trust if not from Media people! Where is the National Press Club now? [ NPC ]. No more policing and regulating. It’s a “free for all.”

    As a result, even political dynasties are now coming out! Many corrupt Media people? What will be next on this phase in our lives? Our lives in democracy imploding?

    Will corruption in Media ever stop? Minimize? Be policed and regulated? Where is NPC? The Media or Journalists are the champion informers for, of and by the people! Where are they? Why are people obviously being misled! Misinformed – voters are making wrong choices! I asked this morning a security guard at a certain bldg infront of Manila City Hall, what he thinks of ERAP’s chances of getting elected mayor of Manila 2013, and he gave me a good answer: If ERAP was number 2 in the last presidential elections, next to PNoy, getting more than 10 million VOTES nation wide, he will be mayor of Manila! Will this be true? But the signs are there.

    Many of us even the wise, etc., , without the Media people, will really be misled and misinformed! How much more the rest of the people? The signs are there.

    Will our country be led by fruits of poisonous trees? In court room trials when experts are presented, lawyers always asks the expert witness: “How much were paid testifying here for Party X?” The same question with the other party by opposing counsel for their expert witness. How much? To the corrupt Media people: How much were you paid for the interview? How much for writing that news Column? How many times how much?

    Is this just a matter for corrupt Media people as part of living? Just hanap buhay at the great damage inflicted by their corrupt conduct?. Is it an acceptable tradition in the trade or situation like the man who committed suicide shooting himself at the cemetery?

    With just the fate of the RH bill coming soon, if it is rejected, more people will be misled and misinformed many times more by corrupt Media people, and this country will be going now where in the long run except to its imploding for something bad we cannot imagine and avoid.

    How can people stop Media corruption? Can we? Should there be a mandatory continuing education for Media people? Where’s the NPC again? Should there be a law policing and regulating journalists or Media people under the Free Speech and Press clause of the Constitution? Or by other powers? Why not?

    Will Media people help us or not? Will the people help you – MEDIA people or not also?

    Shall we help one another or not? One example already is the Maguindanao massacre. The people are in very strong support with the Media people as 33 journalists were killed there! Many other journalists have been slain for doing their work. Are journalists the vanishing tribe here in this country? One by one being murdered! Many killers remain at large. Unsolved crimes on these incidents.

    Shall we help one another or not? What do you say? Leave journalists to their own? Leave the people to believe in the untruths and misleading reports, etc.? If many lawyers are accused of being liars, with many journalists joining as liars too, where is the true speech and press that we, the people should have? These two professions are very important for survival of a true and honest democracy.

    In communist China, the Chinese also loves to hear the truth though they don’t have what we have – free speech and press but they expect to hear speech that is true at least, otherwise if one billion 400 million Chinese are all lying that country will disintegrate! They have as they think necessary, some form of survival for their system. We have our own form but we are tolerating the abuse, like from corrupt Media people.

    As I believe here now and thereafter, one bad result of all this will be the establishment of political dynasties all throughout the Republic, from family to family, government will be ruled for generations and generations. A country of Philippine Families Kingdom!

    So, let us resolve corruption in the Media. Find solutions. Suggest them. Voice them out for the people, our leaders, Congress and for our society of free men and women. For our dear children and grandchildren.

    A democracy we already have, our democracy we must protect and preserve! Not to will be our own disaster.

    • 16.1
      springwoodman says:

      Echoing Comment #1 of Tomas III, it seems that Filipinas have been at the forefront of the fight against colonizers and, now against corruption. History is replete with Filipina heroines – Tandang Sora, Gregoria Bonifacio, Patrocinia Gamboa, Trinidad Tecson and Gabriela Silang, to name a few.

      I was reading Gabriela’s entry in Wikipedia, and I was surprised to discover that church authorities paid to have her husband Diego assassinated. So the church has been complicit in the suppression of the Filipino for the best part of half a millenium.

      Going now to the vehemence of the diatribes here of modern Filipinas – Leona, Chit, Yvonne, Coco, Cha, Pinay710, Rosario, Annie, Sakura Girl, Filipino-Mom, Ella, Vibora, Zamera, Pelang, Vivian and others – let me think some dangerous thoughts and give voice to what extreme measures have tempted our minds.

      Revolution, the shedding of blood and the forced re-education of the elite, will I am certain, make people behave. But it is such a high price to pay. And success is not guaranteed as seen in the Arab Spring. I am also certain idealists have a ready list of people – trapos, bishops, columnists, military personnel – who should be stood up against the wall. And who is going to revolt? Certainly, not the squatters. not the oppressed poor, not the middle class.

      I keep thinking that the one alternative to revolution is individual action or inaction. One individual doing the right thing – or not doing the wrong thing – creates a ripple that grows bigger as others join in. Eventually, a tipping point is reached. Here in this blog, there’s the intention to not vote for dynasts. There’s Raissa refusing monetary hand outs. And there was a dare to stop tithing. These are instances of refusal, of inaction, of negation. Can one persevere in these negations and, if possible, to take them one step further?

      The Filipina has shown her courage in history and in our times – Cory, Clarissa, Conchita, Heidi, Maria, Marites, Patricia, Raissa, etc. Perhaps, men need only cease their macho posturings and follow in their footsteps.

      • 16.1.1
        Tomas Gomez III says:

        The genuine Macho Man respects and recognizes the role and potential of women…for the good of humanity and by the examples cited by “springwoodman,” the Philippines is indeed an international standout. But that is, without being remiss in not forgetting the roles played by a Lucrecia Borgia or an Imelda Romualdez, in the annals of sociopolitical debauchery.

        Trivia: Gabriela Silang was a mestiza…..somewhere in historical gossip, it says she was the love child of the cura in the Ilocos in the early 18th century. She is a Carino (pronounced with an ‘enye’) by her mother.

        BTW…. from far off the field….can you imagine all the good that the USA can achieve if Hillary Clinton were to become President in 2016?

      • 16.1.2
        vander anievas says:

        @springwoodman,
        i’m biting your theory of negation or inaction will be effective.
        doing what is right or doing what is not wrong.
        if we can slowly dry-out the resources of those corrupts, say for example, not voting dynasts, avoiding tithes for corrupt clergies, not buying produce of illegalists, etc., of course will create a domino effect, not felt right away, but eventually will be amplified by the passing of time. i think a lot of Pinoys will join such crusade. we still have a lot of hopefuls…

        • 16.1.2.1
          springwoodman says:

          I’m calling it the Rule of Negation. I believe this is the way we can counteract the wrongs in our society. Refuse. Do not accept. Start with ourselves. Start small.

    • 16.2
      Rene-Ipil says:

      Leona@16

      “Will corruption in Media ever stop? Minimized? Be policed and regulated? Where is NPC?”

      The NPC has severely deteriorated. In fact, its effectiveness (and maybe existence) is greatly threatened by the confiscation by GSIS of the land where NPC stands. That land consisting of about 5000 square meters was donated by the government sometime in the 50s but was foreclosed by GSIS for failure of the NPC to pay its loan and real property tax in 1975. With such huge problem we cannot expect NPC to govern and police its ranks effectively.

      “How can people stop Media corruption?”

      The post of Johnny Lin on the article of Neal Cruz about the 5M or M30 USD bribery of PAGCOR @9 of this topic would be a good start. Also the the exposé of suspected media corruption on the sin tax bill involving Alex Magno, Ducky Paredes, Jojo Robles and Mary Ann Reyes. Netizens can help a lot by commenting and exposing media’s shenanigans.

      • 16.2.1
        leona says:

        @Rene-Ipil at 16.2…NPC mismanagement, etc. Tama si Raissa, why attend elections! So, NPC is or was a private entity on it’s own. If it is a gov’t body for Journalists, with trimmings like others, exempt from real estate taxes, etc., but expected to be run as created, it could live. I just believe NPC or from it a gov’t body is “born” by law, some good things can happen like the perennial corruptions now with some Media people.

        Maybe those still around and keeping Media alive can make the right moves with the national leadership. With support of the public, what more can we lose as against what gains can we make?

        The hope is there but some fire has to be built under it to start cooking the food for the whole family. Now, only some are the prodigal sons and daughters in Media gulping their own meats!

        Imagine 7 sons and 1 daughter being served with 8 drumsticks of fried chicken on the table on two plates for lunch by Mom, no rules and policing. Chaotic! Free for all!

  26. 15
    agot says:

    Can anyone help identify the person refered to by Ms. Alexandra Prieto:

    “In her speech at the opening of the three-day summit on Friday, Inquirer president Sandy Prieto-Romualdez, representing the print industry, said that one of her most disheartening experiences was finding out that “someone you’ve tried your best to support and whose independence you’ve nurtured breaks that trust by selling valuable editorial real estate.”
    “This betrayal weakens the institution deeply and must be addressed with great conviction,” she said”.

    Someone in the Inquirer?

    • 15.1
      raissa says:

      Surely, yes.

      Because she said it was someone she trusted.

      • 15.1.1
        Tomas Gomez III says:

        Why doesn’t she fire him/her? If indeed a PDI employee is one she is referring to, continued stay of that individual makes PDI management complicit. Or is Ms. Prieto-Romualdez’ Tagaytay remarks intended as an eloquent hint for that someone to turn in his/her badge? And, are we starting a guessing game? Sino kaya? Sirit na, please!!!

  27. 14
    ed celis says:

    CANCER ang CORRUPTION sa PILIPINAS. MEDIA, CHURCH, POLITICIANS, nag-bubulag-bulagan, nag-bibingi-bingian sa kahirapan nang karamihang PILIPINO. KUNG ang mga MARCOSes, ENRILEs at iba pang mga kagaya nila ay nasa puwesto pa, talagang wala ng PAG-ASA ang PILIPINAS. DEMOCRACY KUNO, EQUALITY and FREEDOM KUNO, GOVERNMENT by the PEOPLE KUNO, FREEDOM of SPEECH and the PRESS KUNO, FREE ELECTION KUNO…
    NEWS for SALE, VOTE for SALE, JUDGES for SALE, GOD FOR SALE (please forgive me GOD). EVIL SOCIETY, ITS ALL ABOUT MONEY!!!

  28. 13
    moonie says:

    sure, there are many media practitioners and they have conflicting claims. I think reporters are aware of consequences and know that if they wont let badass politicians, powerful politicians, save face and let them have their way once in a while, it will be their jobs on the block, baka langawin pa sila. it’s good to keep communication lines open, baddies can be called back for follow-up interviews and more discussions. crooked politicians have followers too, they have their own crowd, people supporting them like lawyers that comprise their publicity and pr machines. they’re quite loyal as well, until such a time . . .

  29. 12
    emong says:

    Nice topic :)

  30. 11
    danny says:

    seems arnold clavio is a favorite of the arroyo family. remember, he is the same person who interviewed iggy arroyo during the jose pidal fiasco. the same guy who interviewed mikey arroyo , nadisgrasya lang sila ni winnie monsod. bakit kaya siya paborito ?

    • 11.1
      john c. jacinto says:

      clavio is sooooooooooo corrupt. i’d rather go for his puppet look-alike arn-arn all the way.

      • 11.1.1
        Rossi says:

        Arnold clavio WAS really my FAVORITE tv anchor sa GMA.
        pero na sense ko ung one-sided nya noon ke arroyo at mga alipores nya…
        kaya mula noon, ayaw ko na syang makita or mabasa ung article nya sa abante jejejjeeee…

        GRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr….

    • 11.2
      raissa says:

      But you know, the reason why the Arroyos were allowing themselves to be interviewed by GMA was that they were pissed off by ABS.

  31. 10
    parengtony says:

    Last portion of CdeQuiros’ column today:

    “And of course, a point that can never be sufficiently belabored, social media expands the possibilities of democracy. What is democracy without public participation? A democratic government isn’t just for the people, it is of and by the people. Social media functions not unlike the town square, or our very own Plaza Miranda—at least as Plaza Miranda used to be known—allowing public engagement of, or weighing in on, matters of importance to the nation. The fundamental criterion of the soundness of a law then was, “If you can defend it in Plaza Miranda, you can defend it anywhere.” Of course it made for excess too, of course it made for demagoguery too. You can’t always rein in the enthusiasm of people. But better to err on the side of toleration, or liberalism, than on that of restraint, or censorship. In freedom of expression more than others.

    If you can defend it in the social media, you can defend it anywhere.”

    Ms Raissa, I am sure so many are happy for you. Have a great day.

  32. 9
    Johnny Lin says:

    Corrupt Media?

    Read the Latest Inquirer column of Neal Cruz: “Pagcor caught in the middle of Okada Wynn rift”

    Pagcor is not caught in the middle of this rift. Pagcor is a govt controlled corporation giving license to applicants like Okada gambling empire without money exchange.

    In this article there are two obvious talking points and one missing important fact:

    First talking point is: bribery not needed because license have been issued in 2008.
    Second talking point is that the Okada million dollar payments were meant to buy Subic yacht club. In a corporation, plan to buy properties are spelled out in corporate strategies, planning and board meetings. Not coming out of the blue without documented minutes from corporate after questionable issuance of the checks. L

    What is missing in the Neal Cruz Article is the most important published in all newspapers before this column was published.

    That after the $5 million payment(bribe?) was issued, Pagcor thru GMA granted a corporate tax deduction to Okada corporation to maximize gambling profits, issued in March 2010, 3 months before she steps down from office and after appointing Genuino to another term as Pagcor chairman. Genuino resigned from that appointment after controversial GMA midnight appointments including chief justice came into light.

    I am not saying that Neal Cruz received money to talk favorably about Soriano, Genuino and company because they are not Pagcor. Senseless to involve Pagcor the corporation with the rift. Talking points by deflecting the issue along with avoidance of mentioning a bigger issue generate suspicion.

    Talking points plus deflection plus avoidance equals suspicion. Very simple!

    If I were the editor I would reject this column because it is not accurate with all the issues involved. And editors are supposed to be well read and informed on news printed in their newspapers.

    Now, check also the reporter who put out a talking point report that Cong Bagatsing, head of House of Representative investigating committtee seemed to be exonerating Genuino from being involved with the $35 million from Okada Universal corporation without any congressional hearing yet.

    • 9.1
      macspeed says:

      the root of all evil is money, the only way to have good media are for them to include prayers 5 times a day…thats the minimum requirement of God…

      • 9.1.1
        Rossi says:

        Really??

      • 9.1.2
        DaveofBacolod says:

        I get tired of the misconception/belief of this BS saying: “money is the root of all evil” (sometimes you can place power or any tangible/intangible noun here). Money and Power (Since these two are always mistaken to be the source of “all evil” whatever that means) are always intertwined and the least common denominator regarding the various social wrongs and injustices that we witness/experience everyday.

        But for now I’ll give my opinion regarding “money.” What is money? Most of us will say in a heart beat that it is a currency, coins/paper bills, gold/silver/other precious metals, used for purchases/bills. But we are forgetting the most essential description of money, it is a “medium” that we use to value services/goods that we either purchase or sell. In short money is simply a representation or a tangible object we humans invented for the sake of convenience regarding trade and commerce. That inherently it is an inanimate object, it is “morally neutral” and unless understood by those who use it (heck aliens might be living in a Utopian society, you know :) ) it can be useless like a piece of dirt.

        Having money is not “immoral”. Using it is not “immoral”. Even keeping it is not “immoral”. What is immoral is loving it to the point that the value of money is not important, but the value of “having” it is most important. That is the time when the “use” of money becomes the root of all evil. But why must we criticize money? It is amoral when misused (by misuse i mean ignorant of it) or not in use and therefore cannot generate evil.

        We must then turn our attention to us, humans. It is said that everyone has a goodness inside us (Hitler loved his dogs) and that we are vessels of unlimited potential. We possess intelligence,ambitions and goals. What makes us different from animals is that we govern ourselves according to the accepted norms of the society, in other words we have social ethics. We as humans therefore has the capability of diverging or following the standard or rules set by our society. These “rules” govern our behavior on how we should use tools around us for the benefit of the greater good.

        The problem starts when we use these tools to “cheat” society and let our ambition grow to the point that we will railroad every Values known to man in pursuit of our personal interest. Money is simply a tool used by corrupted individuals to access/amass/control power (another tool,though intangible, useful in society). That the individual him/herself is corrupted and has money does not make money evil per se, but the manner on how the individual obtains/uses money makes it tainted with evil. We must condemn the choice of the individual to be corrupted and in choosing so used a tool used by society in daily transactions.

        So we must not blame money since it is only a tool, a medium for commerce. But we should condemn societal corruption of inherent Values ( profit is a motivator for greed although profit itself is not That Bad). So next time we should condemn the behavior and the term should be like this: “too much love of money is a source of evil” with emphasis on the adjective “too much love”. (You see love is always considered good but placed in context it can be a powerful source of evil)

        • 9.1.2.1
          Polpot says:

          Actually, if we trace what purpose money serves and what reason people do evil and immoral things, you will find Freud’s ego at the bottom of it all. Egocentrism, too much self love, and the absence of other-orientedness is the reason why people want to be richer and richer, want more and more power.

          Maybe it is a good thing that Asian culture hone people to be collectivistic and not individualistic.

      • 9.1.3
        leona says:

        @macspeed…you mean “payors” 5 times a day?! as minimum. What’s the maximum? hahaha…

        • 9.1.3.1
          DaveofBacolod says:

          Dapat yung kumikita nang atleast 10% sa equity funds sa UITF’s xempre ngaun tiba2x ang UITF, 30% year on year :)

      • 9.1.4
        tristanism says:

        Actually it’s the LOVE OF MONEY that is the root of all evil.

    • 9.2
      Monty says:

      There seems to be an all out campaign by Soriano/Genuino to clear their names by paying off both media and politicians. I remember talking to a high ranking SBMA official last year and he mentioned that Genuino indeed bought the Subic Bay Yacht Club. I never heard Okada’s name come up and I’m pretty sure the Yacht Club was not worth $30m. Is there any way of checking who actually bought the club and for how much?

    • 9.3
      Rene-Ipil says:

      Johnny@9

      Yes. It is a squid tactic employed by Neal Cruz to mislead the public into believing that the matter is an Okada-Wynn fight. But the truth is that it is an issue between Universal/ Okada and the Philippine government involving tax exemptions as well as other benefits granted by GMA at the near-end of her regime. Okada spent about 30M USD to ensure the profitability of the firm and convince his partners to support him. But it was done at the expense of the Filipino people by depriving them of revenue tax – their lifeblood.

  33. 8
    Sarah says:

    I think it really has to start from the top down. In the corporate environment that I am currently working in, any dishonesty or fraud is frowned upon by the top management and a code of conduct is strictly enforced on everyone. The result is that everyone is reluctant to do the wrong thing because they know the consequences.

    BTW, Marites Vitug also has a good article on media ethics in Rappler.

  34. 7
    AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

    I really miss the Philippines FREE PRESS. I think Teodoro M. Locsin’s mag and staffwriters were the “cleanest” among the media during its time…. Locsin and Co. practised what it preached. That of being the foremost enemy of corruption, malfeasances and shennanigans in government and society. Its writers are incorruptible, apart from being heads and shoulders above the rest in terms of polished, grammatical, sensible, glistening prose. Topped by Locsin, Sr., they were Nick Joaquin, Greg Brilliantes, Napoleon Rama, Kerima Polotan, Wilfredo Nolledo, Felimon V. Tutay — and yeah, Jose F. Lacaba. How I wish the FREE PRESS and its stable of magical word-weavers were still all around. Lacaba — and Teddy Boy Locsin, Jr. — I think are the only remaining remnants of that group. Sigh. Kakamissed. :(

    • 7.1
      AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

      Correction: “Its writers are incorruptible…” s/b “Its writer were incorruptible…..”

    • 7.2
      chit navarro says:

      WE must belong tot eh same generation… :)
      I do miss Free Press and al the writers you mentioned – including Quijano de Manila – I do not remember anyore whose pen name that is.

      I ebg to disagree though that Teddy Boy Locsin jr. is one of the remaining remnants of the group – he belongs to Free Press, alright, but I do not believe he within the league of his father, et al.

      FREE PRESS – fair and balance in reporting the news…!

      We get that now in CPM – CyberPlaza Miranda…

      • 7.2.1

        I remember the old Locsin crossed swords and had a running battle
        with T Valencia. T Valencia’s grammar and writing skills were proved
        garbage. Is Teddy Boy a product of heredity or his environment?.

      • 7.2.2
        Vibora says:

        @chit navarro
        Quijano de Manila is Nicomedes “Nick” Joaquin.

        • 7.2.2.1
          AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

          You’re right, Vibora. QUIJANO DE MANILA was Nick Joaquin. I so admired Joaquin that in our office organ which I edited I used as one of my pseudonyms — QUIJANO DE SAN MATEO. Kapal ko, noh? ;)

      • 7.2.3
        AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

        Chit, thanks. When I “included” Teddy Boy in that August Group, I only meant he was already within the Philippines FREE PRESS although most prolly still a student. Once in a while I ran across his already well-written short pieces. OK, I grant that during the LocsinSr-Joaquin-Rama-Brilliantes-Polotan era, Teddy Boy did NOT belong yet. But he WAS already family, who I presume was already cutting his journalistic teeth in the background. Hehehe. Ok ba, Chit? You got another point: We belong to the same generation. And are both NOW members of the Tanders Club! A.K.A. Senior Citizen 20% Discount Club! YEBAHHHH!!! [That's ex-Manila Mayor Tony Villegas' famous battlecry, right?]

        • 7.2.3.1
          AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

          And speaking of Mayor Villegas, his anti-smoking slogan is still needed now, especially by our No. 1 Citizen: “DI DAHIL SA NAIS NA KAYO’Y PIGILIN, NGUNIT IYANG USOK AY MASAMANG HANGIN!” A slogan which we teeners then childishly revised and graffiti’d in jeeps to “DI DAHIL SA NAIS NA KAYO’Y PIGILIN, NGUNIT ANG UTOT AY MASAMANG HANGIN!” Hahahaha! Dem deys of yore! When we were fifteen, footloose and fancyfree. Aside from always having NO MONEY!” :(

        • 7.2.3.2
          chit navarro says:

          very true…. to the Senior Citizen Club and YEBBAH… I only wish I am a resident of Makati so I could enjoy free movies and get a birthday cake reminder…. :)

          and to Teddy Boy, well, he has remained a “BOY”… has not grown up really!
          during the time of President Cory, he wrote excellent speeches but when he netred politics, it’s a different story and somehow, this must have coloured his life’s lens….

          and on the question on “What can we do to minimize media corruption?”…
          we should not patronize newspapers whose opinion writers are perceived to be “on the take”, “Corrupt”, etc….. as netizen, we should start questioning their articles and expose their intentions to cover up or shut up…

          Social Media will play a major role in the coming elections… and newspaper owmers/publishers will soon feel the pinch with a reduction in readership.

          What about that idea then to come up with a group parallel to CPM that will be more active in creating awareness for truth this coming election? A group that is separate from Raissa’s blog so that her independence/neutrality is not compromised?

          • 7.2.3.2.1
            AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

            From CHIT: QUOTE… “we should not patronize newspapers whose opinion writers are perceived to be “on the take”, “Corrupt”, etc….” UNQUOTE.

            Done. I’ve long ago stopped buying/reading such papers as Manila Standard, Malaya, Tribune… TRIBUNE! HAHAHA! Halatang-halata!! I wonder how those broadsheets can go on publishing altho no one seem to buy them. Ano kayang sikwet nila? Wink. Wink.

            BTW, Chit I got something with Teddy Boy. I also have remained the “Boy” my family, closed friends and ex-colleagues call me. Talk of oxymoron! Tandang Boy! Hahaha! :)

  35. 6
    yeheywater says:

    @ Tomas Gomez III

    Visiting and commenting at online news report half an hour a day is not a big ask as well, I think

  36. 5
    Johnny Lin says:

    In media integrity and honesty begin with publishers and editors but buck stops with the reading public. Readers have to be savvy in reading or listening to interviewees. Bias reporter is easily spotted with the kind of questions posed to candidates. When the interviewee is given lots of leeways to explain his side and no follow up hard hitting questions, be suspicious in the interviewer.
    Example: when Karen Davila was interviewing Mayor Co on the Pagadian pyramid scam. Two times Davila asked her about the report he was receiving investors money and his answers were entirely unrelated to the question. He was making different explanation and Davila did not say, “you were not answering my question directly”. Same thing happened to Taberna when he interviewed Corona. He gave Corona time to explain without asking obvious follow up questions pinning him to explain source of his bank deposits.

    Among columnists, it’s easy to spot someone offering unsolicited explanation, explicit and implicitly favoring somebody in the limelight. Or a political columnist suddenly writing extensive “talking points” on the merits and hardships of a business entity. Not that the columnist is forbidden to do such thing, but very obvious that the explanation is one sided without interviewing the other party involved.

    Internet patrol may be the answer. Reading something in the news from reporters or columnists, post in Internet or Raissa’s blog and comment on the slanted report hoping someone honest and inquisitive might take a page out of it or becomes viral in social media. Like what we did on the interview with Bishop Arguelles calling for a catholic vote and tagging Pro RH advocates as “ethnic cleansers” or our stand on Cybercrime law and Sottonism.

    Netizens could be powerful guardians of honest media. 2013 election Netizen Watch must be front runner to educate voters against senatorial interlopers and greedy political dynasties like Enrile, Binay, Ejercito and Angara.

    • 5.1
      Rene-Ipil says:

      Johnny Lin@ 5

      Was it Anthony Taberna or Arnold Clavio or both? I think both even asked leading questions to Corona at the time that Corona was having a TV roadshow to condition the public’s mind immediately before he presented his defense during the impeachment trial.

      • 5.1.1
        Johnny Lin says:

        You are right but Taberna interviewed Corona twice or shall I say “relinquished his TV time slot to Corona”

        He he he

        • 5.1.1.1
          Rene-Ipil says:

          There was a compelling reason for Taberna to do that as an INC member. But as to Clavio, there were much more reasons. I am reminded of his interview of GMA who obviously picked him for the job at the time she was arrested for poll sabotage.

          • 5.1.1.1.1
            vander anievas says:

            the more Taberna should be on the guard of his comments, INCs are known to be more devoted to their belief and considering their faith superior over others. i think Mang Tonyo now had a twisted version of fairness. he is not anymore the hardhitting guy of dos por dos. kung kelan nagka-award saka nangurag…
            before i only listen to their program “dos por dos” in the early morning and early evening airings. but during TJ’s trial i found him often times out of balance. i was turned-off. no more dos por dos, since then. my reading of him is, he’s only granstanding in his program, got me boring.

      • 5.1.2
        raissa says:

        But you see, both reporters were among the very few that Corona allowed himself to be interviewed by.

        They did draw information that gave us insights about Corona. For instance, Arnold Clavio was able to draw form Corona the fact that he owned an arsenal :)

  37. 4
    Vibora says:

    It’s no wonder why people vote crook and corrupt politicians. Some people always blame the “masa” for electing bad people into office. I blame corrupt media for feeding the populace with corrupted news and lies.

    • 4.1
      Rene-Ipil says:

      Vibora@4

      The purpose of media is to tell the people what is truly happening in our country. Good and bad. But it seems that the news and opinions that the people get are those good for the pockets of the journalists and their benefactors. Without the money to grease the media machinery, conscientious and honest government officials are usually ignored, if not vilified, for them to come across.

      So, what information do the people usually receive from media? Those that are misleading, if not deceiving. In that case, overwhelming corrupt politicians are re-elected while the few honest politicians are replaced or removed from office by the voters who are either corrupt, clueless or deceived by media.

    • 4.2
      filipino_mom says:

      @vibora, i think that the bigger problem is that during election season, what’s being reported are news on personalities, not on the elections itself or the issues relevant to the elections. syempre, those who are artista, socialite, with connections are the ones who are in the news. and not just in the evening or national news, kasali na sa showbiz news saka “human interest” news.

      i wish that we could have debates just like the ones that they have in the recent US elections. focus on the issues, no-holds-barred para magkaalaman na talaga. have these shown in the town halls / gymnasiums tulad ng mga laban ni pacquiao (who is useless as a congressman, btw and a mysoginist, imho).

  38. 3
    zamera says:

    The social networking sites are not just for socializing and getting in touch with friends. Nowadays they are used by the ordinary mass to play Big Brother not just to high profile people but also to monitor what is actually going on. FB, Twitter, etc had become platforms of choice for information dissemination.

    Previously, we are just given the bird’s eye view based on how we get got the news, how it had been delivered, and what been delivered – it may or may not be the complete picture, or whether it was impartial or biased. Newspapers got opinion columns, and so are TV channels having news programs and commentary segments. Inevitably they are read and viewed, and more likely than not, from these we form our own opinion too – right or wrong :)

    Thanks to the internet, and social media, plus of course these lovely gadgets with cams, we are now getting the news and info almost always “from the ground”. ;) More realistic, oftentimes no holds barred exposure :)

  39. 2
    Art Montesa says:

    I don’t see anybody being able to stop or even put a dent on media practitioners who sell their souls to political trapos for many, many pieces of silver. But with social media like Facebook and Twitter, they can be exposed and put to shame. Not that that’s going to change things. What needs to change is the Mafia culture among Filipinos in general, especially politicians and anybody with access to money – to show off, to buy palaces, expensive cars and gadgets, to accumulate wealth like it’s going out of style, and even to kill if that kind of lifestyle is ever threatened. And if one does not have access to money, he can rob and kill.

    • 2.1
      Michelle says:

      It’s pure and simple malpractice. Media is in existence because they have credible scribes whom people have some kind of confidence in, that maybe there because of few choices available, and it is fair game to just be accepting of them.

      Media is actually a controlled commodity by the oligarchy, and they have absolute stranglehold on practically everything under the sun in the Philippines. So it is in their interest that media keep lying whenever they are asked to by their owners, the oligarchs!

  40. 1
    Tomas Gomez III says:

    Ang higit na nakararaming matitino sa ating media ay pawang mga babae……”the fairer sex.”. Isa na diyan si Aling Raissa….kabilang sila Maria Resa, Maritess Danguilan Vitug, Chay F. Hofilena and many, many others. Of course, there are male stalwarts also. We have got Vergel Santos, Alan Robles, Johnny Mercado etc.
    But the ladies are at the vanguard of taming and curbing the corruption in media not only by their professional behavior but by the courage with which they publicly air and discuss this hydra-headed menace to democracy. Sana dumami pa kayo. The fact that corruption in media was a bone to contend with during the last Media Nation conference in Tagaytay is a good sign. May pag-asa pa! Awareness among CPMers is encouraging. Consumers of news…..meaning, all of us, ought not be shy about airing our critical sentiments. What else can we do?……fellow CPMers, let us get to work!

    • 1.1
      raissa says:

      There are many, many more who are straight.

      But they just work quietly.

      • 1.1.1
        Johnny Lin says:

        Agreeably, many more honest journalists are around. However, newspaper publishers and editors also know the identities of the rotten ones.

        Who will spearhead media clean up? the top 3 widely circulated ones have owners whose credibility and integrity are not kosher? The shining knight might be the prominent incoming buyer but he is no business fool ending up like HP with Autonomy!

      • 1.1.2
        leona says:

        Raissa, how are journalists “policed or regulated” separately from other professions, as to their actions like lawyers they have the Integrated Bar of the Philippines [ IBP ], other professions by the Professional Regulation Commission [ PRC ] if there is such?

        If there is none, should journalists have it or be subject to it under Congress’ exercise of police powers, or free speech and of the press powers? Or other powers in the Constitution? The IBP I think is by the Judiciary power through the Supreme Court.

        • 1.1.2.1
          gayyem says:

          @leona, we used to have the NPC (National Press Club) whose job, I believe, is to “police, regulate and champion” journalists’ rights. I don’t read of it anymore, especially after the Maguindanao massacre. I wonder what happened to it?

          • 1.1.2.1.1
            raissa says:

            I’m supposed to be a lifetime member of NPC :)

            Haven’t attended any election for years.

            • JJ says:

              That could be one of the factors that made NPC silent for sometime. No attendance, No meetings, No elections,.. or No plans. ;)

              • Tomas Gomez III says:

                The utter deterioration of the National Press Club, both as an institution and as a venue for social/professional interaction is a story by itself. It has got to be told. Perhaps if Alan and/or Raissa can still find the time, that story need to be told. In any case, some enterprising journalist ought to and perhaps we can wish that that edifice (and what it stands for) overlooking the Pasig river can be revived. The deterioration of the NPC might be symbolic of corruption in media, as well. I first joined it in 1957. I was then with Manila Times Radio….when broadcast journalism was still an infant …..and so was I !!!

              • gayyem says:

                @JJ, in short, naging kanya-kanya or “divide and rule” na lang. No wonder, our country has gone to the dogs! Decades ago, when I was young, we took pride in our country being called “Pearl of the Orient Sea”. Then, in a matter of a few decades after, the calling changed for the worse: “sick man of Asia”, “hemorrhaging woman of Asia”, etc. I dread to see the day when it will be called “goat excrement (tae ng kambing) of Asia! This may not be far fetched because of dying institutions like the NPC which should have been a bulwark of responsible and truthful reporting for the country’s common good. The way it looks today, there seems to be no “common good.” It appears each person/institution/company has his own agenda to pursue whatever happens even to the point of bribing one’s way because he can always go to the confessional anytime and be given an absolution of his wrongdoing! I wish we had been ruled by the Japanese for a long time to have adopted their nationalistic discipline of doing a “harakiri” when exposed as having shamed their country!

              • DaveofBacolod says:

                @gayyem i would have preferred it if the Brits stayed after 1764. Although not that much better than the Spaniards regarding colonial governance, at least they disdain corruption and try to develop their colonies. They could have changed the culture of Filipino politics then by demanding accountability and responsibility. Instead we languished under 124 more years of Spanish decadence and the interference of the Catholic Chruch.

          • 1.1.2.1.2
            leona says:

            @gayyem…seppoko, a gory way of ending for shame, by the Japanese culture would have been ours too! As you wished they should have stayed longer here. Only Angelo Reyes did that so far. [RIP Angelo] No, the Japanese would still leave early our place as not many Pinoys would do seppoko! Many Pinoys would instead do Kawatwatako!

            @DaveofBacolod…the Brits you said you wished also to have stayed after 1764. If they did, on July 4, 1946 when they “left” we were shocked to find that they “carved out” our country into three: Luzon to China; Visayas to Malaysia and Mindanao to Indonesia! The Brits are fond of carving out territories after they leave it. Nothing for Pinoys!

            • DaveofBacolod says:

              @leona

              With regards to the Philippines I believe they will try to incorporate it within the Federation of Malaya. Although to think of it the term “Filipino” was non-existent until the 1896 Revolution. During that time the populace consider themselves belonging to a Regional Culture or a Provincial identity. We might be carved into three different countries but it won’t matter that much if it happened because carving out a National Identity is already hard during that time. The tyranny of the Spaniards forged the Nationalism of the Philippines and although the Brits are not saints themselves, you will see that in most of their former colonies, governments are stable and people has a sense of responsibility when given the opportunity to govern themselves.

      • 1.1.3
        Rene-Ipil says:

        Gayyem@1.1

        You wrote: “Decades ago, when I was young, we took pride in our country being called “Pearl of the Orient Sea”. Then, in a matter of a few decades after, the calling changed for the worse: “sick man of Asia”, “hemorrhaging woman of Asia”, etc.”

        What do you mean by etc.? To me it means “now, Philippines is the emerging tiger of Asia”. I am merely quoting economists and businessmen, local and abroad.

        • 1.1.3.1
          gayyem says:

          @Rene-Ipil. You asked “What do you mean by etc.?” I’ll give you two: 1. A country with a ‘damaged culture’; 2. A country with the most number of political dynasts. As for 1., here’s the link:

          http://schemers.us/culture/2005_11_01_archive.html

          http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/1987/11/a-damaged-culture-a-new-philippines/7414/

          For 2., what could be more convincing than a Vice-Pres. openly endorsing his daughter to run for Senator and Senate Pres. his son to run for Senator in the coming 2013 elections. In the provincial and town levels, it’s even worse. The endorsers are giving the excuse that it’s the people who are going to decide after all. By this line of thinking, it’s the Filipino electorate who are building political dynaties.

          • 1.1.3.1.1
            Rene-Ipil says:

            Gayyem@1.1

            Meaning that “etc.” includes only the negative sides of my beloved country, the Philippines. This is confirmed by your statement that “I dread to see the day when it will be called “goat excrement (tae ng kambing) of Asia!”, which statement forecloses any positive development about the country. Now, I understand how damaged our culture is, considering that you are a Filipino. Please correct me if I am wrong about you.

            I understand that a damaged culture is “a culture that pulls many Filipinos toward their most self-destructive, self-defeating worst”. Fallows wrote his article a generation ago right after Marcos regime while Rodis wrote about Fallows article shortly after GMA stole the presidency from FPJ. The 1987 “damaged culture” model of Fallows saw many, if not most, Filipinos wanting a change in nationality. Only a few days ago, Inquirer columnist Jose Montelibano wrote that our local citizens now do not envy anymore their “kababayan” in the US. The main reason is not economics but good governance.

            Probably, the Philippines would really be damaged if Binay became the next President with either Bongbong or Jinggoy as Vice President.

  41. Mariano Renato Pacifico says:

    Why Filipinos cannot tell distortion from daan-matuwid ? Because Filipinos cannot have the facility to know the difference because their only source of MISINFORMATION IS TFC CHANNELS !!!!! And Adarna comics !!!!

  42. fcb328 says:

    Ms. Raissa, now that you opened “a can of worms” (Corruption in the Philippine Media), is there a prevalent “code of silence” in the media community. It is prudent not to name names?
    Or Is this just an inherent gene is the filipino psyche-culture-attitude.
    Can’t the media police itself ? What percentage of the journalists in the Philippine Media are on the take and have integrity-credibility?

    • raissa says:

      I don’t know the percentage that’s on the take.

      I suspect this rises and ebbs.

      The media can police itself if it wants to. The people can do the policing as well.

    • raissa says:

      Yes, there is an informal code of silence – just like in other professions.

      I think it’s a human trait, and not just a Filipino trait.

      I don’t know the percentage of those on the take. The problem is, there are some prominent ones who give the entire profession a bad name.

  43. Coco says:

    Off topic.

    Manila Auxiliary Bishop Broderick Pabillo believes Pablo is “God’s punishment” on Filipinos for even daring to contemplate passage of the RH bill.

    Is this the same God that let perish 2,000,000 Filipino fertilized eggs by lack of implantation yearly ? 500 Pablo deaths versus 2,000,000? Bishop, please enlighten me.

  44. Mel says:

    When NO to fear, bribery and omissions were a rarity, and lock down to padlock was just the norm to stifle the Freedom of the Press some 30 years ago.

    NEVER FORGET | 30 years after the WE Forum raid, the Philippine press relishes a lesson on freedom

    By: Lourdes M. Fernandez,
    InterAksyon.com
    December 7, 2012 6:00 PM

    MANILA, Philippines – Shortly before noon on December 7, 1982, a team led by Col. Rolando Abadilla, then intelligence chief of the Metrocom, raided the offices of the WE Forum, the trailblazer of the “Mosquito Press” under martial law. The soldiers hauled off voluminous documents, padlocked the printing press and jailed WE Forum publisher-editor Jose G. Burgos Jr., his father Jose Sr., and several columnists and newspaper staffers.

    Two sites were actually raided in what is now simply refered to as the “WE Forum raid”. Both sites were in Quezon City: the home and office of Jose Sr. on No. 19, Road 3, Project 6; and the office and printing site that Jose Jr. leased at Units C and D, RMC Building, Quezon Avenue.

    It was a raid that drew condemnation all over the world, and exposed further the repressive nature of the Marcos regime. But it was also a seminal moment in the Philippine democracy movement, further emboldening a rising army of human rights defenders, and drawing a line behind which the opposition to Marcos – still under military rule – would not move back but only forward.

    Read the rest of the commemorative piece at http://www.interaksyon.com/article/49895/never-forget–30-years-after-the-we-forum-raid-the-philippine-press-relishes-a-lesson-on-freedom

    • raissa says:

      My father was one of the lawyers defending Burgos et al, along with lawyers Joker Arroyo, Rene Saguisag, Jejomar Binay and Martiniano Vivo.

      • Mel says:

        I remember those days, I hold your father in good stead.

        I was grateful, I’m appreciative of your efforts through your blog today.

        Makes us all wonder what changes has befallen Joker Arroyo, R Saguisag (Erap’s impeachment lawyer), Jejomar Binay. Anu balita kay Martiniano Vivo?

        Good tidings…

  45. leona says:

    Nahuli sila sa FB! No question the 4 had almost verbatim writings. Even their denials how it came about are likewise almost the same too! The link is

    http://www.newsbreak.com.ph/

    Mag ingat na kayo! hahaha…

  46. leona says:

    Off topic…John MacAffee the creator of the anti-virus program in his name, after being denied in Guatemala for political asylum, suddenly got sick…chest pains! Somebody from this country must have called him up what to do! Who? The link

    http://news.yahoo.com/mcafee-hospitalized-being-denied-asylum-221742664.html

    • pinay710 says:

      @mam/sir leona, mula’t sapul ang Pilipino ang nangongopya sa america, ngayon isang americano ang nangopya ng systema ng mga Pilipinong opisyal pagnahuhuli. ang kaibahan po nayan hindi MANUAL WHEELCHAIR ANG GAGAMITIN NI MCAFEE, MOTORIZED PO. saka nasa ibang bansa sya. heheheeh siguro po napanood nya kung paano nakawheel chair si gma at morato.

  47. docbebot says:

    Just read at Interaksyon Alex Magno, former DBP director, charged by the Ombudsman.

  48. jeproks2002 says:

    Media corruption is worst when others in media turn a blind eye to what their corrupt colleagues are doing. A sin of omission if you will. I am glad Ms. Raissa has raised this issue when others would rather brush it off. I have yet to hear or read any comment by the four columnists regarding their curiously similar “writing styles”. Perhaps they think this is not a big deal and hope this thing will just go away.

    The Maguindanao massacre is condemnable and must not happen again. This is a sensitive matter but I have to ask. I find it curious why so many media people were there. Could they have been paid too? If so, how much? Is this payment to cover a media event an accepted practice? I know lawyers and their legal teams are paid for their legal services during elections. Are media practitioners paid fees also by the candidates to report?

    • Johnny Lin says:

      Those 4 are all corrupt, bet the house on that.

      Silence is golden!
      Before everybody was in the mood to talk. Suddenly everyone has sealed lips.
      1. Arroyos
      2. Media- 4 columnists
      3. Genuino and Soriano
      4. Morato and PCSO officials
      5. Latest is PSC comission-er Alfredo Po who was entrapped recently with bribery by NBI

      He he he

    • Aurora pascua says:

      Very good and straight to the point of questioning the media ? Why ?

  49. Joe America says:

    Interesting commentary.

    I rather think that LIFE is a corruption, the art of wandering amongst half-truths and self-justifications and erroneous or incomplete information. The internet makes things happen even faster, which can be bad (biased information from paid hacks strewn across the ether) or good (the public eyeballing and outing bad behavior). Plus, the internet rather redefines privacy and those who like to be truly private ought not let Google enter their lives, not to mention the cookie monsters.

    I think that politics and press have always been strange bedfellows, and now the internet simply allows us to see it more clearly. I think trends are up, not down.

  50. Mel says:

    Media corruption shortchanges the public? What about ““The Omissions of “Mainstream” Journalism: “History in the Un-Making”“?

    “Project Censored: Important stories unreported or suppressed by the media most Americans watch or read.”


    For 36 years, Project Censored, based in California, has documented critically important stories unreported or suppressed by the media most Americans watch or read. This year’s report is Censored 2013: Dispatches from the media revolution by Mickey Huff and Andy Lee Roth (Seven Stories Press). They describe the omissions of “mainstreamjournalism as “history in the un-making”. Unlike Leveson, their investigation demonstrates the sham of a system claiming to be free.

    Source: www globalresearch ca ““The Omissions of “Mainstream” Journalism: “History in the Un-Making”

  51. emong says:

    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=556468304378605&set=vb.100000463213409&type=2&theater

    This should be the kind of projects our government and private companies should have for our hero OFWs… nakakaiyak…. pero nakaktaba ng puso.. :) Merry X’mas to all!

    • raissa says:

      I like the thought behind it but it is, in the end, a commercial for the product.

    • leona says:

      @emong…walang biro…pag may sarap na lechon, umi-iyak ako pag ‘di ko ma balatan yan! Nakaka iyak talaga! Btw, don’t get to drinking the product, WATER is for our human body and not that! Of course, coffee has water mixed in it!

    • pinay710 says:

      @emong, pinaiyak mo ako ha. salamat. maligayang pasko din sa inyong lahat!!!

    • davide says:

      maski commercial at least it made lots of people happy. in a way may even though its a commercial for Coke, may napaligaya naman those who were lucky to have been chosen. they should do that very often, christmas, thanksgiving, all souls day etc.

      very touching maski ang motiff is commercial. makalipay ug makahilak ang paglantaw sa video.

  52. upright bike says:

    If i wrote an article about a bridge and its benefits to the general public and the local government or any government agency treated me to a lunch and gave me P 1,000 for my taxi fare, am I corrupt?

    Or should I exercise more diligence and investigate if the bridge has any structural defect, or should I investigate who the the contractor was, or is the bridge really necessary?

    These questions will highlight the gray area shrouding the issue of media corruption. Every story is the product a reporter’s efforts and his judgement call.

    It is not very easy to tag a journalist corrupt for attending a luncheon dinner hosted by a government official or an agency.

    As they say. you write a story as you see it.

    • springwoodman says:

      IMHO, yes you are. Not a gray area at all.

      • Victin Luz says:

        I agree with@springwoodman……exercise a positive duty enjoined to every journalist @ upright bike……discern or gather facts before you start writing. Casual lunch together with the employees of the government host could be acceptable especially if the venue is within their office but accepting a Taxi Fare will never be tollerated.

        Hatid sundo ng service vehicle nila ay pupwede pa , but your positive duty as a journalist is whatever ” NO STRING ATTACH ” just Attack if there are anomalies .

    • Alan says:

      If you are going to write about the benefits of a bridge, have a lunch with govt officials at their expense and receive taxi fare to boot, you may as well CONTRACT to write the press release for the agency, because you’re not practicing journalism, you’re doing PR.

      For me having a free lunch is borderline excusable (less so if you’re the only one attending) but receiving “taxi fare” is outright corruption. How many times in my career has someone waved a bulging envelope in front of me after a press event while saying “pang taxi” or “pang meryenda” — I have never accepted.

      If I were the one doing the story you’re talking about I’d start by researching everything I can about the bridge through public records and sources and officials, follow that up by interviewing people living nearby and taking pictures of the bridge, talking to specialists, looking over what I have and then going back to the officials and specialists with whatever new questions I’d have formulated during the entire process. Whatever I end up with will be what will shape my story.

      Everyone knows most journalists aren’t paid well, but that’s the nature of the job. If you can’t live within this realization then get out and be a PR. But if you’re using the title of “journalist” as a cover for PR, then you are a problem to the profession.

    • leona says:

      @upright bike…what do you say to that “As they say you write a story as you see it”? That’s it? Or it should say “One write a story as one see P1,000.00 to it?”

      For just attending a luncheon dinner as you said it, it is easy to say there is no corruption yet.

      Making further examinations and investigation on that bridge is the appropriate thing to do IF or WHEN one is a journalist who wrote something about the bridge. Since you accepted the P1000 already, use it to make the further investigation and with GUTS revised your news report to say that bridge is DANGEROUS pala! And “bite the bullet” as Raissa says.

      There is no truth about a GRAY AREA when truth reporting is the goal. It is only a human brain that has a color of it…gray.

      Btw, be very careful riding the bike…don’t run along gray areas or you could get hurt on the bike lanes. Have a nice day bike rider!

  53. andrew lim says:

    A BIT OF GOOD NEWS

    I’ve been studying Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index 2012 for some time now. Last year, the Philippines got a ranking of no. 129 out of 182 countries. This year, it got a ranking of 105 out of 176 countries evaluated.

    SOME CAVEATS:

    1. The index is a composite, using a combination of surveys and assesments of corruption collected by several reputable institutions. (from the website) In the Philippines, a total of 9 surveys were used.

    2. Since corruption is a behavior not easily measured, and becomes known only after a scandal breaks or an investigation has started, the best way to measure it is through assessments of those in a position to do so.

    3. You cannot compare the rankings over time because the methodology is not strictly similar every year- the number and kind of surveys used. So you cannot say the new ranking of 105 for the Phils is an improvement over the 129 it got last year. The methodology will become standardized in the coming years, allowing a comparison over time.

    4. What is a cause for some joy is the relative position of the Phils since it is now closer to the middle than before. So you can argue that yes, corruption levels as perceived by survey respondents has improved. You can infer that Pnoy’s anti-corruption drive has made some headway.

    5. The CPI is now getting more attention and companies making investments do look at it more intensely now.

    Ituloy ang laban sa korapsyon!

    @ Raissa, I posted something on Gil Cabacungan’s PDI article on Jackie Enrile’s interview. It got lost.

    • yeheywater says:

      The Link below must be the one andrew lim is talking about…

      http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/318521/enrile-gives-up-monument-to-self-now-an-eyesore-on-ayala-avenue

      or the one before, which is at # 6.1, this page.

      Try also reading Raissa’s link…and few of its comments.

      “about Enrile’s early wooing of the media by clicking here”

      • Johnny Lin says:

        This is the second time in two consecutive months Gil Cabacungan wrote something POSITIVE for Jackie Enrile.

        Raissa wrote about this kind of reporting based on the book of Hofilena in her blog above.

        The third time we read another feature on Jackie by Gil, telltale sign is confirmed.

        Cant blame to look for extra income for Christmas season needs heavy expenses.
        Sandy Romualdez might need to deliver another scathing speech on another employee.
        Calling Media censors!

        He he he.

        • raissa says:

          It’s possible that Gil wrote about Enrile because he makes good copy at this point – being the son of the Senate President and running for the Senate himself.

          As a personal disclosure, I was the one who first hired and trained Gil in Business Star of The Star Group. He’s mainly a business writer who switched to writing on politics.

          I would like to see more of Gil’s writings on Enrile.

          • Johnny Lin says:

            Everything is possible. Equal distribution of write ups among candidates exude fairness.

            Marites Vitug wrote about gray areas. Two positive articles less than one month apart is quite revealing. In between no other prominent senatorial candidates had positive features. Astonishing assignment!

            Aside from Enrile the other legitimate sons running for senators are Angara and Pimentel. Or controversial leftists, Hontiveros and Casino or that independent Hagedorn who had a colorful past life.

            You might have trained him, but he is not a fruit, just a grafted tree. Not all grafted trees successfully bear sweet fruits. From business to politics, hmmm!

            Peanut butter is spread evenly, lumping it becomes expensive butterfinger.

            Just a thought. Precaution is prevention.

          • parengtony says:

            I found this particular article quite interesting and also very well written. All three property developments mentioned have always been arousing my curiosity – so huge yet so “bitin”, all of them.

            Also, I could not see any obvious positive slant in favor of either jackie or his dad to warrant the tag “PR work” (as explained by Alan) instead of a journalistic one.

            • springwoodman says:

              “Any publicity is good publicity.”

            • jeproks2002 says:

              the slant i see is the subliminal reference to jackie’s supposed business acumen. it would seem he had a better perspective than his shrewd father when he wanted to invest in real property in Laguna. the message could be that the son can be better than the father.

              • Johnny Lin says:

                First article portrayed Jackie as:
                1. Youth was reason of recklessness
                2. He was actually the victim of his dad’ s position
                3. He is areform person and godly

                Second article portrayed him as:
                1. Visionary
                2. Obedient loving son
                3. Wisest in the family with managerial skill

                Watch out for coming features dealing with his compassion, kindness, honesty, integrity, government service, responsible parent, peace loving person and incorruptibility.

                Before Marcos switched to Nacionalista party personal features of him were released by cooperating newspaper, Manila Chronicle owned by Lopezes eventually Fernando Lopez was his VP. Positive features included circumstances of his innocence in the killing of Nalundasan, scholastic honors and hardships, war exploits(courage and valor), attributes( kind and compassionate) charisma(how he wooed Imelda) and a doting father, vision of a better Philippines and capabilities.

                Beat student of Marcos is named Juan Ponce Entile
                Coincidence?

              • Rolly says:

                @parengtony @jeproks2002

                Propaganda…that’s the name of the game. They want to show to madlang people that they are clean, that their ill-gotten wealth is not that much to finish the project. I would like to think though, that Enrile is wealthier than Danding Cojuangco, given the fact that Enrile had the favor of Marcos in the early days of martial law.

                Kung si Marcos merong $15B (gold excluded), payat kay Enrile ang 2 bilyong dolyar..

                Enrile headed the Philippine Coconut Authority that subsequently bought 72 % of Cocobank. As of today, Cocobank, AKA, UCPB is one of top 20 banks in the Philippines. source: Wikipedia

                If my memory serves me right, Danding and Enrile were the co-owners of the Republic Planters Bank in the early 80′s (could not find much reference to this).

              • Rene-Ipil says:

                Jeproks@26.1

                The slant I see, aside from the purported good business acumen of Jackie, is the exposure of the huge value of the property nowadays which was purportedly acquired in 1987. It insinuates that the property was “purchased” at a much smaller amount 25 years ago but is now worth more than a billion pesos. So that the people would think that JPE is really big time now.

                But I think the Ayala property is just the tip of the iceberg insofar as true wealth of Enrile is concerned. He was the next most powerful man in the Philippines during martial law and I believe also that his wealth is topped by Marcos’ only. What we are “allowed” to see is the Ayala and JAKA properties only.

    • leona says:

      @andrew lim…Tama si Raissa. And the Jack article is barya…shortchanging or it is mute! Kailangan yun mahirap ma sukli-an! It is not loud or thunderous. Sa Sabung…tiyope!

  54. curveball says:

    kaya ang mga politiko ay malapit sa media kasi dito sila magiging effective. tulad ng mga tao sa probinsya at baryo halimbawa, bago pipili ng iboboto syempre makikinig muna sa mga sinasabi ng announcer sa radyo. magbabasa ng mga dyaryo at artikulo ng mga manunulat. dahil sa hindi naman nila personal na kilala silang lahat. at kung ano ang mas nakararami at mas madalas na mabasa at marining na pangalan ay yun ang magiging gabay sa iboboto nila. kaya swerte na kung malaki an gpondo ng politiko para araw araw na may magandang isusulat sa kanya o kwento tungkol sa kanya. at malas ang politiko na walang press release dahil di sya maalala… sino sya???? talo na uli ang mga taong kahit na may malinis na puso sa serbisyo pero walang pera pambili ng “airtime at space”.
    ito ang malungkot na katotohanan sa mahal ko bansa.

  55. Jett Rink says:

    media can also downplay some issues and make people forget them, like the West Tower pipeline fiasco. protecting FPIC and its owners.

  56. Monty says:

    Copied from Neal Cruz’s article in the Inquirer “Let’s look at the charges raised against Okada by some lawmakers who had allied themselves with Wynn. The first salvo, fired four or five months ago, claimed Okada spent $110,000 to billet the present Pagcor chair and his predecessor in Macau. That attack fizzled out because people naturally asked: Why raise the issue only now?
    Then came the accusation that Okada bribed then Pagcor consultant Rodolfo Soriano $5 million to get a license to operate a casino in Entertainment City. There is also the claimed payment of an additional $10 million to Soriano that never was, but was made to look in media like it actually happened.”

    Copied from Ducky Paredes’ article in Malaya “In his first salvo from four or five months ago, Wynn claimed Okada improperly spent $110,000 to billet the present Philippine and Korean gaming officials in Macau. (This was Wynn’s excuse for redeeming Okuda’s 20% share in Wynn’s Resorts at only $1.9 billion, a 30% discount at market value!. Okuda is still fighting for full payment!)

    That attack fizzled out in the Philippines because people naturally posed the question, why raise the issue only now? Besides, the practice of ostentatious digs given free to visiting firemen is common practice in the Casino business.

    Then came the accusation that Okada bribed former Pagcor consultant Rodolfo Soriano $5 million to get a license to operate a casino at the Entertainment City in Pasay. There’s also the claimed payment of $10 million to Soriano that never was but was made to look in media like it happened. In fact, according to a recent Reuters story, Soriano’s take has already been estimated to have exceeded $30 million and counting.”

    This is way to much!! Corrupt na tamad pa! They didn’t even change the prepared position paper made by whoever bribed them.

    • Sarah says:

      I’m not surprised. Angela Casauay from Rappler also had an article which cited 4 columnists for having similar articles on the sin tax. What a waste of column space.

  57. andrew lim says:

    Off-topic, on RH:

    To the casual observer, one of the more substantial arguments by the anti-RH camp is the issue of their taxes being used for a purpose that offends their religious beliefs.

    According to them, it is not acceptable for the govt to use taxpayers’ money for contraceptives, etc because it is against their religion.

    HOW TO REFUTE THIS

    Having an economics background, this is how you counter this: Public money has no religious face. Once your taxes enter the treasury, it loses its religious character. The govt exists for all, not just Catholics. No religious group can compel a govt to make a move that favors them alone. The Catholic church does not own the Philippine Republic.

    If you follow the logic of their argument, you will be led to ridiculous situations:

    Can Moslems ask for a stop to the Dept of Agriculture’s support of hog-raisers because pigs offend them?

    Can a pacifist group (those who abhor violence in any form, even self-defense and law enforcement) now have a tax deduction equal to the amount that goes to the DND, AFP, PNP because the purchase of guns and bullets offend them?

    Preposterous.

    Given that you disagree with a govt’s policies, then your recourse is to elect one that you agree with.

    • baycas says:

      The State is mandated by the Constitution NOT to favor or disfavor any religion.

      This is the principle of “The Separation of Church and State“. The State is being the one ordered.

      And just to remind everyone, the Church referred here is NOT confined to the Catholic Church.

      • yeheywater says:

        The separation of Church and State is oftentimes misquoted and misused by the churches in their favor.

        The Catholic Church quotation of “taxpayers money” implies that they are paying taxes themselves.

    • et says:

      “Loss of religious character” is just palusot the state uses to avoid entanglements. In the end, every taxpayer knows that “this is where your taxes go,” no matter what the economists tell him.

      “No religious group can compel a govt…” But can government compel members of religious groups to act contrary to their beliefs? What about the constitutional guarantee that the free exercise and enjoyment of religious profession and worship shall forever be allowed?

      On the hypothetical Moslems asking the DA to stop supporting hog-raisers: Is it a correct analogy to raise a dietary restriction to the same level as protecting the unborn? Also, maybe the reason that Moslems have not complained is because they can easily refrain from eating pork. Would it be as easy for Catholics to stop abortifacients from being handed out at the health centers?

      On the pacifist group: is there an existing world religion for this? How many Filipino citizens are bona fide members? Should we be exercising our imaginations to the extreme just to come out with preposterous examples?

      It’s easy to say that you should elect a government that you agree with, but has this issue been raised as part of the candidates’ platforms before? Would there be any candidate that you would agree with completely? If not, then the best recourse would be to argue against those policies that you disagree with, wouldn’t it? (Because not voting for that candidate in a later election would be too late to address the issue at hand.)

      • andrew lim says:

        Thanks for the intelligent comments. My responses:

        1. Separation of church and state is very clear as @baycas above posted. It is not “palusot.” Your money cannot retain a religious identity when you pay it as taxes.

        2. Who’s compelling whom to use contraceptives?

        3. I raised the Moslem (you can include Hindus, too for cattle) and pacifists as examples to show the absurdity of that anti-RH argument. Because when you enact laws, you anticipate the possible scenarios that may arise. In this case, allowing a religious group (RCC) to ban/approve govt policies based on its beliefs runs counter to church/state separation. (Rep Garcia attempted it in his killer amendment )

        Who’s to say if a dietary restriction is of lesser or greater or equal importance to your religious objection to RH? These are all religious beliefs.

        Disagreeing like what you are doing right now is guaranteed by the Constitution. And so is a rebuttal of it like what I just wrote.

        • et says:

          Thanks, too, for your reply. My follow-on responses:

          1. Semantics does not change the fact of where the tax money came from. It only insulates the state from possible legal entanglement. The devout, moral Catholic could still see his tax money being used for the purchase of possible abortifacients. (To Victin Luz: please note that some contraceptives can be considered abortifacients, e.g. those that prevent implantation.)

          2. In light of #1 above, the state would be compelling Catholics to support the distribution of possible abortifacients.

          3. Indeed, the possible consequences should be examined. However, the examples raised are not valid: Moslems and Hindus can simply avoid eating the offensive foods; and there doesn’t seem to be any organized religion of the pacifist group with any significant numbers. These straw men do not equate with the potentially millions of Catholics whose rights could be affected when the state uses their tax money for purposes that go against their religion.

          I compared the dietary restriction to the right of the unborn, not just a religious belief. Does the right of the unborn belong in the realm of religion only?

          Rational argument and counter-argument are of course, the best recourse, which is why I wonder what was the purpose of your previous statement: “then your recourse is to elect one [govt] that you agree with”. I would not want to believe that you were, in effect, telling people who disagree to stop arguing and just not vote for them again, but this is what statement seems to imply.

          The questions raised in the first reply remain unanswered.

          • springwoodman says:

            1. State money is State money. It is not Catholic money or Protestant money or Muslim money. It is not semantics.

            2. The State will allocate funds for the common good.

            3. What rights of Catholics are being affected by the RH Bill?

            4. Do Catholics have greater rights than other Filipino citizens?

            • et says:

              1. State money is taxpayers’ money as we are reminded that “This is where your taxes go.”.

              2. The state should ensure that no citizens’s rights are violated when allocating funds to its projects.

              3. The Catholic citizen’s right to free exercise of his religion will be affected when his taxes are used to procure and distribute possible abortifacients.

              Also, the state will violate its policy of protecting the life of the unborn from conception.

              4. Catholics have equal rights as other Filipino citizens. If a conflict between these rights seem to exist in the proposed law as is implied by your question, then isn’t that an indication that it needs to be corrected?

              • springwoodman says:

                1. Agree. It is not Catholic money.
                2. As a general rule, yes. Specifically, no.
                3. Catholics can choose not to avail of benefits provided by the State.
                3.1 What is the ethical position of the Church between the rights of a mother and the unborn child?
                3.2 What is the ethical position of the Church between overpopulation and the quality of life?
                3.3 The State is not proposing abortion. Stop peddling that myth.
                4. Remember, the common good is the rule. The law cannot satisfy everybody.
                4.1 Why do Catholics have this sense of entitlement? That everything must be according to their beliefs?

              • Victin Luz says:

                @ET……. Ha ha that is why in the RH BILL , health centers will educate you the correct procedure when to USE contraceptives and a thorough check up/rigid examination when you have done sex on the first time without contraceptive and asking to take contraceptive before second encounter ( of course you have to tell the truth what happen during your first time )

                A contraceptives taken for the first time before sex will prevent only the UNIFICATION of sperm and egg cells,,, you are not aborting anything because there is no implantation yet @ET………. Medicines taken when there was already a UNIFICATION of S & E cells ” may implantation na iyan sa uterus ” some medicines are abortifacient. CORTAL and other ordinary medicines when taken overdosage it became abortifacient.

                Kaya ko sinasabi na ” it might be considered as abortifacients ” Because other ordinary medicines especially a certain medicine for ULCER when taken overdosage if you are pregnant it can abort your baby.

                But contraceptives to be produce upon the approval of RH BILL must be 100% not abortifacients. Be as it may still it should be introduce to woman’s body before sexual intercourse , to be safe.

          • Victin Luz says:

            @ET……..the purpose of the RH BILL is to teach partners/couples to use contraceptives BEFORE Conception meaning contraceptives used will prevent the unification of sperm and egg cells so no implantation yet or no early stage of pregnancy.

            Contraceptives used after conception means contraceptives as you said will become abortifacient . But as long as contraceptives are utilize before human life begins , that is before conception or taken before SEXUAL INTERCOURSE It will/must not be abortifacient.

            I disagree with you @ET……..we will not be talking here of unborn child, none at all.

            • Victin Luz says:

              If you are talking now about abortion @ET……… RH BILL is also against abortion, so that dietary restriction to the right of the unborn is of no moment here @ET…… Of course if you do a sexual intercourse during your fertility period FIRST without contraceptive then RH BILL will prevent you in using/taking a contraceptive on SECOND time or THIRD time because a UNIFICATION of egg and sperm might be successful during you FIRST time does such contraceptives might be considered as abortifacients.

              So we have to argue now that those opposed to the RH BILL ( Catholics, cngressmen, senators and etc. ) were wrong and come election time we will not vote those who are against the RH BILL.

              • Victin Luz says:

                @ET…….how would the state compell the Catholics to support the distribution of possible abortifacients…….. HOW @ ET…… Kindly explain to us how……. Palagay ko ay hindi mo binabasa ang nasa loob ng RH BILL , Walang pilitan iyan sa pagpunta, paghingi at paggamit ng Contraceptives….. Kung ayaw mo wag mo…….. But to those who are willing to slow down pregnancy whether rich or poor mother ,the corresponding Health Centers will teach and give you the procedure in consuming contraceptives.

              • et says:

                To Victin Luz: Do we have a definitive classification of contraceptives whether they are abortifacients or not? How will the list of allowed contraceptives be decided upon? Will it be a big concern for you if abortifacients get included in the list?

              • et says:

                To Victin Luz

                How will the RH Bill “prevent you in using/taking a contraceptive on SECOND time or THIRD time”?

          • andrew lim says:

            @et

            We wont get any further on this conversation because of your beliefs that taxpayer money retains a religious or Catholic identity in your case. As @springwoodman comments below, state money is not Catholic money or Mustlim money. It’s not yours anymore when you pay it.

            By the same token, Catholics can just not partake of contraceptives offered in health centers, if it offends them. But since not everyone is Catholic, why prevent others from having the opportunity to use them by preventing passage of the bill?

            The “right of the unborn” is not a striclty defined legal precept. It will have to brought to the SC for a definitive answer. Your religious group does have a stand on that, but not everyone shares that.

            Lastly, I was operating under the scenario in which the bill has been passed – the alternative, among others, is for your group to elect officials that share your views. Or challenge it in the courts.

            • et says:

              To andrew lim

              The restriction on Catholics is not just on the use of contraceptives. Catholics are also expected to view abortion as abhorrent, which is what would be happening if abortifacients are somehow included in the list of contraceptives handed out at the health centers.

              The state policy on the unborn is clear: The state shall protect the life of the unborn from conception (equally with the mother). Why should the SC have to rule on this?

              • springwoodman says:

                @et

                You keep quoting the Constitution on protecting the life of the unborn.

                No where do you mention the doctrine of the separation of Church and State. I wonder why.

              • et says:

                To springwoodman

                Separation of Church and State works both ways, so the State should not interfere with the free practice of the citizens’ religious beliefs, which could be the case if it compels citizens to pay taxes for use in ways that would be contrary to their beliefs.

                In #3 above, your response was to ask about the ethical views of the Catholic church. However, the question was about what rights of the citizen who happens to be Catholic are being affected. In any case, since it is the State that is coming up with the law, then it should be scrutinized to see if it could affect basic human rights, and if inadvertently, it might be allowing abortifacient drugs even if it is stating otherwise.

                In #4 above, the law not pleasing everybody is OK, but the law should take care not to affect the rights of the citizens. It is not a sense of entitlement, it could just be an awareness of one’s basic rights.

      • Victin Luz says:

        Yes, @et…… Argue now the govt. policies you disagree with and at the same time by not voting candidates whose platforms are objectionable at your end, come election time.

        Please just a reminder the RH BILL contraceptives/pills are not abortifacients .

      • Victin Luz says:

        @ET …….ganito para maliwanagan mo. Halimbawa 10 classes of contraceptives are allowed to be utilized on RH BILL and all the ten will prevent the UNIFICATION of S & E cells, …..pero ang 2 or dalawang contraceptives will not only prevent the unification but also abortifacients nga , nakalusut, pinalusut ng Drug Company, ngayon kung gagamitin man ng isang ginang ano man sa 2 abortifacient ,…..as long as they will consume that contraceptives before sexual intercourse ,,…..ay ano naman ang ilalaglag mo ay wala pa namang implantation or earlynstage of pregnancy,,……ang linaw @ET…my example is only to prevent the unification of S & E cells ( science di ba )

        • et says:

          To Victin Luz

          So you are OK with the possible/probable misuse of the 2 abortifacients? In effect, magiging available yung mga pampalaglag from the Health Centers?

          • Victin Luz says:

            @ @ET………ganito ang sinasabi ko @ET…….after the approval of RH BILL we spicifically our GOVERNMENT, DOH or any attached agencies thereat MUST exercise their POLICE POWER in monitoring the production of 100% non abortifacient contraceptives. …………in the event that for example 1 or 2 contraceptives were produced and delivered in Health Centers……..nakalusut, pinalusut, hindi nakita while mixing certain percentage % components of the contraceptives at naging abortifacient nga bukod sa it will not only prevent the UNIFICATION of the S & E cells,…… As long that these nakalusut na abortifacient pill are taken or consumed before conception , wala ka namang ilalag e diba at wala ka pa namang ilinalaglag @ET…..unang encounter bago mag sex ha.

            • Victin Luz says:

              Misused….. Hindi pwede iyan @ET…..ang health centers nga ang nagtuturo sa inyo na wag mag misused… Basta gamitin bago mag sex sa unang pagkakataon, at Kung kailangan gamitin afterwards araw araw na consuming para any sex thereafter the s and e will not unite, gawin nyo.

  58. andrew lim says:

    Just want to share this article written by Gil Cabacungan in the PDI, Dec 5, 2012:

    http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/318521/enrile-gives-up-monument-to-self-now-an-eyesore-on-ayala-avenue

    It’s about Jackie telling the story of their white elephant building in Ayala, missed opportunities, and family disagreements.

    Now, what could this story accomplish?

    1. That the Enriles are human and normal – they have disagreements and make mistakes.

    2. Make you forget that Jackie has no credential to be a Senator, other than being a son of his father.

    Could this be a sample of slanted journalism? You decide.

    If I am mistaken, then that failed monument is a fitting description of Enrile’s poltical career – a grotesque attempt at vanity, and a politics wanting in ideals and principles.

  59. docbebot says:

    Why did a Lopez publish Enrile’s memoir?

  60. Martial Bonifacio says:

    Maam raissa i hope you will allow me to post this link since it provides a picture of a “common poster area” that can be adopted by the PH government (comelec).

    http://news.yahoo.com/japan-campaign-opens-focus-economy-nukes-090357476.html

    We have something similar here in SoCal na ginagamit every election day ng hindi nakakalat kung saan saan ang mga itsura ng mga politiko. I hope this will reach the government & MMDA ng hindi parating malaki ang gastos sa paglilinis ng kalye during and after the 2013 election.

  61. manuelbuencamino says:

    Raissa,

    1. How are those broadsheets without any readership to speak of able to keep publishing? What or who keeps them afloat?

    2. Why is it okay for businessmen or corporations who do business with the government or own public utilities to also own/operate print or broadcast media?

    3. We saw it during Estrada’s and Arroyo’s terms: cronies buying newspapers and turning them into pro administration propaganda outlets. Is this not a form of corruption in media also? And way back when, we saw how the Lopezes used their media as a weapon in their feud with Marcos.

    4. It’s not cheap to own a newspaper or a broadcast medium. And it has to make money. How does media stay independent of its owners and the wishes of advertisers?

    • Alan says:

      (1) Philippine newspapers are unique in that most of them are not published for profit. Most papers are publlished for political reasons (years back, by Marcos cronies and taipans) — because it’s prestigious for a businessman to have a media outfit, or as “insurance” in the publicity game, or as a weapon for attacking enemies and defending friends and interests. Because these papers aren’t published with making profit in mind, the goal is to just minimize losses and to that sort of mindset, giving higher pay to journalists doesn’t figure very prominently
      (2) Because there are no laws against it. There’s a law against foreign ownership of the press and supposedly against “monopoly” (trimedia)
      (3) Yep.
      (4) Some manage. As for the others…well you can judge by the content and standards or lack thereof

  62. Tomas Gomez III says:

    Please see my comments on the National Press Club, in response to gayyem, Raissa and JJ…..at the very bottom of #1. Maybe Johnny Lin, leona, Andrew Lim, et al…may have some remembrances, too and their valued thoughts, as well. damo nga salamat.

    • andrew lim says:

      @Tomas Gomez III

      Buddy,

      Im not a professional journalist, and I’m not that old to remember that building. :)

      But I do remember the value of an NPC election- holding it in a building with a back entrance enabled Satur Ocampo to escape while voting. ha ha ha ha

      (I am not endorsing the extreme left here. I reject their brand of politics.)

    • Johnny Lin says:

      Buddy

      Wow, NPC member 1957, when I was still innocent who Magsaysay was.
      What I remember was MOPC looking down at their colleagues in NPC, partying at Maharlika pavillion across Intramuros. NPC members hang around outside the grounds of the Round Table while MOPC members gather inside the Front Page across US Embassy.

      At that time there was Roces Manila Times, Hans Menzi Manila Bulletin and Lopez Manila Chronicle, the latter two based in Intramuros including NPC building.

      There was also then Press Photographers of the Philippines with Honesto Vitug as president and Cynthia Ugalde as Miss PPP

      Now, there is National Union of Journalists of the Philippines, NUJP, another press organization. Must be disgruntled members of NPC.

      Like Andrew I am not a journalist either but remember how honest, credible and dignified members of the press then riding mass transportation on a daily basis.

      Now, Pajeros and Toyotas are natural gifts.

      He he he

    • leona says:

      @Tomas…re that NPC bldg…unused for quite sometime, isn’t it? Is it already a sign of a long ago …it’s death? I mean, the NPC is dead, isn’t it? But the reason it was supposedly created, for MEDIA or the human beings -JOURNALISTS, are still alive, isn’t it? Only that with NPC and it’s building [unused now for its lofty purpose] not anymore functioning as it should, MEDIA or journalists have been “released” to whatever fate that will lead them/it to. It is imploding or has it imploded? The former is taking place. The latter is still to be seen.

      Without something like the NPC [ should be existing as a mandatory legal entity ] Media people are on the loose! A void is created. The Media people or the people at large cannot fill this void. It’s an empty something inconsistent with its existence. Is “is not.” Void. Is not “is.”

      This topic re Media and the actions of journalists, will soon, very soon, implode as I said here. “It” or “is not” will cease for all good intents and purposes. Only for the the worst or bad it will be! The chain reaction, to what it is directed to, living in democracy, will obviously follow, cease also. A necessary consequence. Not noble or lofty anymore! Is it because of MONEY? A greed for it? Principally, yes.

      People or the sovereign might of the land must have some legal body to help and nurture the Media and the journalists as a legal body organization. Without such a body, it is free wheeling to all directions without regulation and policing. A detriment to the news necessary for the people as sovereign. We have a situation of “Blind, Deaf and Dumb” atmosphere.

      I hope for a body like NPC but created by law for the purpose or any other but not to have an unintended implosion and be useless. We can write diverse things here, do a lot of reading and opinionating, etc. Without an NPC legal body, Media is at it’s worst and will be more of it in the long run of everyone’s life. A body for it and breathing life to it is needed. A form for it. Now, it’s not there or it’s seems it is there. Which? It is not anywhere!

      We, the people should do this if we want news reporting, etc. be at par. Honest, truthful and not corrupt. My message to the corrupt Media people: You are creating a void you cannot fill.

      The country needs you. The people needs you. Why not take the call? The good challenge? You believe in the word “worth.” Are you worth it? Only you can answer.

    • leona says:

      @Tomas….sorry, I have never been inside of the NPC bldg and I don’t like to. Why? I might have hairs standing feeling and seeing there are GHOSTS WRITERS there! …typing sounds on their Underwoods, Olivettis, Olympias, IBMs, keyboards! Btw, mayroon ba? Kwento mo por favor!

      • Tomas Gomez III says:

        The typing clickety-clack sounds from manual writing machines and teleprinters were not audible….these were in a couple of offices of news agencies renting spaces in the lower floors. A good part of the building was leased space. The venue for social/professional interaction was the top floor which had a restaurant (good cuisine, too!) and a well-stocked bar overlooking the Pasig River with the prominent Binondo business edifices right across and the Jones Bridge to the right. The regulars hang around the bar to unwind. That is also where the Botong mural was displayed. As I recall, the elevator was on the east side of the building with the stairs going around the elevator shaft’s housing. I must visit the place for a look see and update, next time I visit. I also wonder if it is still operating!!! There are now so many “kapihans” or lunch cum discussions hosted in several hotels. This regular events are news gathering, news creating and political gossip sources all rolled into one. Once upon a time, the NPC was the venue for very important press conferences that needed a more legitimate and professionally convenient venue.

  63. leona says:

    Raissa says being a life-time member of NPC, she hasn’t attended any elections for years now. @gayyem says NPC hasn’t been heard of since specially after the Maguindanao massacre. For good reasons surely, NPC is not anymore doing any “police work or regulating and championing” journalists!

    Thus, Raissa’s article here hits the nail on the head! Media corruption! Democracy in corruption [as one says here]. So, our society, with Media in this situation, is in total corruptions. Name it, under the sun and the moon, all over corruption! Even with some of our religious personalities.

    Media for people is a source of confidence and trust. Sovereignty resides in the people. If people are receiving false and lies from many corrupt media people, from newspapers, TVs shows, radios, etc., it must be so widespread to have such false and lies swallowed by many of the people.

    Thus, many false and lying candidates are elected. Many elected officials are lying and misleading the many people. Because of many Media corrupt people! Where will the people get such news of confidence and trust if not from Media people! Where is the National Press Club now? [ NPC ]. No more policing and regulating. It’s a “free for all.”

    As a result, even political dynasties are now coming out! Many corrupt Media people? What will be next on this phase in our lives? Our lives in democracy imploding?

    Will corruption in Media ever stop? Minimize? Be policed and regulated? Where is NPC? The Media or Journalists are the champion informers for, of and by the people! Where are they? Why are people obviously being misled! Misinformed – voters are making wrong choices! I asked this morning a security guard at a certain bldg infront of Manila City Hall, what he thinks of ERAP’s chances of getting elected mayor of Manila 2013, and he gave me a good answer: If ERAP was number 2 in the last presidential elections, next to PNoy, getting more than 10 million VOTES nation wide, he will be mayor of Manila! Will this be true? But the signs are there.

    Many of us even the wise, etc., , without the Media people, will really be misled and misinformed! How much more the rest of the people? The signs are there.

    Will our country be led by fruits of poisonous trees? In court room trials when experts are presented, lawyers always asks the expert witness: “How much were paid testifying here for Party X?” The same question with the other party by opposing counsel for their expert witness. How much? To the corrupt Media people: How much were you paid for the interview? How much for writing that news Column? How many times how much?

    Is this just a matter for corrupt Media people as part of living? Just hanap buhay at the great damage inflicted by their corrupt conduct?. Is it an acceptable tradition in the trade or situation like the man who committed suicide shooting himself at the cemetery?

    With just the fate of the RH bill coming soon, if it is rejected, more people will be misled and misinformed many times more by corrupt Media people, and this country will be going now where in the long run except to its imploding for something bad we cannot imagine and avoid.

    How can people stop Media corruption? Can we? Should there be a mandatory continuing education for Media people? Where’s the NPC again? Should there be a law policing and regulating journalists or Media people under the Free Speech and Press clause of the Constitution? Or by other powers? Why not?

    Will Media people help us or not? Will the people help you – MEDIA people or not also?

    Shall we help one another or not? One example already is the Maguindanao massacre. The people are in very strong support with the Media people as 33 journalists were killed there! Many other journalists have been slain for doing their work. Are journalists the vanishing tribe here in this country? One by one being murdered! Many killers remain at large. Unsolved crimes on these incidents.

    Shall we help one another or not? What do you say? Leave journalists to their own? Leave the people to believe in the untruths and misleading reports, etc.? If many lawyers are accused of being liars, with many journalists joining as liars too, where is the true speech and press that we, the people should have? These two professions are very important for survival of a true and honest democracy.

    In communist China, the Chinese also loves to hear the truth though they don’t have what we have – free speech and press but they expect to hear speech that is true at least, otherwise if one billion 400 million Chinese are all lying that country will disintegrate! They have as they think necessary, some form of survival for their system. We have our own form but we are tolerating the abuse, like from corrupt Media people.

    As I believe here now and thereafter, one bad result of all this will be the establishment of political dynasties all throughout the Republic, from family to family, government will be ruled for generations and generations. A country of Philippine Families Kingdom!

    So, let us resolve corruption in the Media. Find solutions. Suggest them. Voice them out for the people, our leaders, Congress and for our society of free men and women. For our dear children and grandchildren.

    A democracy we already have, our democracy we must protect and preserve! Not to will be our own disaster.

    • springwoodman says:

      Echoing Comment #1 of Tomas III, it seems that Filipinas have been at the forefront of the fight against colonizers and, now against corruption. History is replete with Filipina heroines – Tandang Sora, Gregoria Bonifacio, Patrocinia Gamboa, Trinidad Tecson and Gabriela Silang, to name a few.

      I was reading Gabriela’s entry in Wikipedia, and I was surprised to discover that church authorities paid to have her husband Diego assassinated. So the church has been complicit in the suppression of the Filipino for the best part of half a millenium.

      Going now to the vehemence of the diatribes here of modern Filipinas – Leona, Chit, Yvonne, Coco, Cha, Pinay710, Rosario, Annie, Sakura Girl, Filipino-Mom, Ella, Vibora, Zamera, Pelang, Vivian and others – let me think some dangerous thoughts and give voice to what extreme measures have tempted our minds.

      Revolution, the shedding of blood and the forced re-education of the elite, will I am certain, make people behave. But it is such a high price to pay. And success is not guaranteed as seen in the Arab Spring. I am also certain idealists have a ready list of people – trapos, bishops, columnists, military personnel – who should be stood up against the wall. And who is going to revolt? Certainly, not the squatters. not the oppressed poor, not the middle class.

      I keep thinking that the one alternative to revolution is individual action or inaction. One individual doing the right thing – or not doing the wrong thing – creates a ripple that grows bigger as others join in. Eventually, a tipping point is reached. Here in this blog, there’s the intention to not vote for dynasts. There’s Raissa refusing monetary hand outs. And there was a dare to stop tithing. These are instances of refusal, of inaction, of negation. Can one persevere in these negations and, if possible, to take them one step further?

      The Filipina has shown her courage in history and in our times – Cory, Clarissa, Conchita, Heidi, Maria, Marites, Patricia, Raissa, etc. Perhaps, men need only cease their macho posturings and follow in their footsteps.

      • Tomas Gomez III says:

        The genuine Macho Man respects and recognizes the role and potential of women…for the good of humanity and by the examples cited by “springwoodman,” the Philippines is indeed an international standout. But that is, without being remiss in not forgetting the roles played by a Lucrecia Borgia or an Imelda Romualdez, in the annals of sociopolitical debauchery.

        Trivia: Gabriela Silang was a mestiza…..somewhere in historical gossip, it says she was the love child of the cura in the Ilocos in the early 18th century. She is a Carino (pronounced with an ‘enye’) by her mother.

        BTW…. from far off the field….can you imagine all the good that the USA can achieve if Hillary Clinton were to become President in 2016?

      • vander anievas says:

        @springwoodman,
        i’m biting your theory of negation or inaction will be effective.
        doing what is right or doing what is not wrong.
        if we can slowly dry-out the resources of those corrupts, say for example, not voting dynasts, avoiding tithes for corrupt clergies, not buying produce of illegalists, etc., of course will create a domino effect, not felt right away, but eventually will be amplified by the passing of time. i think a lot of Pinoys will join such crusade. we still have a lot of hopefuls…

        • springwoodman says:

          I’m calling it the Rule of Negation. I believe this is the way we can counteract the wrongs in our society. Refuse. Do not accept. Start with ourselves. Start small.

    • Rene-Ipil says:

      Leona@16

      “Will corruption in Media ever stop? Minimized? Be policed and regulated? Where is NPC?”

      The NPC has severely deteriorated. In fact, its effectiveness (and maybe existence) is greatly threatened by the confiscation by GSIS of the land where NPC stands. That land consisting of about 5000 square meters was donated by the government sometime in the 50s but was foreclosed by GSIS for failure of the NPC to pay its loan and real property tax in 1975. With such huge problem we cannot expect NPC to govern and police its ranks effectively.

      “How can people stop Media corruption?”

      The post of Johnny Lin on the article of Neal Cruz about the 5M or M30 USD bribery of PAGCOR @9 of this topic would be a good start. Also the the exposé of suspected media corruption on the sin tax bill involving Alex Magno, Ducky Paredes, Jojo Robles and Mary Ann Reyes. Netizens can help a lot by commenting and exposing media’s shenanigans.

      • leona says:

        @Rene-Ipil at 16.2…NPC mismanagement, etc. Tama si Raissa, why attend elections! So, NPC is or was a private entity on it’s own. If it is a gov’t body for Journalists, with trimmings like others, exempt from real estate taxes, etc., but expected to be run as created, it could live. I just believe NPC or from it a gov’t body is “born” by law, some good things can happen like the perennial corruptions now with some Media people.

        Maybe those still around and keeping Media alive can make the right moves with the national leadership. With support of the public, what more can we lose as against what gains can we make?

        The hope is there but some fire has to be built under it to start cooking the food for the whole family. Now, only some are the prodigal sons and daughters in Media gulping their own meats!

        Imagine 7 sons and 1 daughter being served with 8 drumsticks of fried chicken on the table on two plates for lunch by Mom, no rules and policing. Chaotic! Free for all!

  64. agot says:

    Can anyone help identify the person refered to by Ms. Alexandra Prieto:

    “In her speech at the opening of the three-day summit on Friday, Inquirer president Sandy Prieto-Romualdez, representing the print industry, said that one of her most disheartening experiences was finding out that “someone you’ve tried your best to support and whose independence you’ve nurtured breaks that trust by selling valuable editorial real estate.”
    “This betrayal weakens the institution deeply and must be addressed with great conviction,” she said”.

    Someone in the Inquirer?

    • raissa says:

      Surely, yes.

      Because she said it was someone she trusted.

      • Tomas Gomez III says:

        Why doesn’t she fire him/her? If indeed a PDI employee is one she is referring to, continued stay of that individual makes PDI management complicit. Or is Ms. Prieto-Romualdez’ Tagaytay remarks intended as an eloquent hint for that someone to turn in his/her badge? And, are we starting a guessing game? Sino kaya? Sirit na, please!!!

  65. ed celis says:

    CANCER ang CORRUPTION sa PILIPINAS. MEDIA, CHURCH, POLITICIANS, nag-bubulag-bulagan, nag-bibingi-bingian sa kahirapan nang karamihang PILIPINO. KUNG ang mga MARCOSes, ENRILEs at iba pang mga kagaya nila ay nasa puwesto pa, talagang wala ng PAG-ASA ang PILIPINAS. DEMOCRACY KUNO, EQUALITY and FREEDOM KUNO, GOVERNMENT by the PEOPLE KUNO, FREEDOM of SPEECH and the PRESS KUNO, FREE ELECTION KUNO…
    NEWS for SALE, VOTE for SALE, JUDGES for SALE, GOD FOR SALE (please forgive me GOD). EVIL SOCIETY, ITS ALL ABOUT MONEY!!!

  66. moonie says:

    sure, there are many media practitioners and they have conflicting claims. I think reporters are aware of consequences and know that if they wont let badass politicians, powerful politicians, save face and let them have their way once in a while, it will be their jobs on the block, baka langawin pa sila. it’s good to keep communication lines open, baddies can be called back for follow-up interviews and more discussions. crooked politicians have followers too, they have their own crowd, people supporting them like lawyers that comprise their publicity and pr machines. they’re quite loyal as well, until such a time . . .

  67. emong says:

    Nice topic :)

  68. danny says:

    seems arnold clavio is a favorite of the arroyo family. remember, he is the same person who interviewed iggy arroyo during the jose pidal fiasco. the same guy who interviewed mikey arroyo , nadisgrasya lang sila ni winnie monsod. bakit kaya siya paborito ?

    • john c. jacinto says:

      clavio is sooooooooooo corrupt. i’d rather go for his puppet look-alike arn-arn all the way.

      • Rossi says:

        Arnold clavio WAS really my FAVORITE tv anchor sa GMA.
        pero na sense ko ung one-sided nya noon ke arroyo at mga alipores nya…
        kaya mula noon, ayaw ko na syang makita or mabasa ung article nya sa abante jejejjeeee…

        GRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr….

    • raissa says:

      But you know, the reason why the Arroyos were allowing themselves to be interviewed by GMA was that they were pissed off by ABS.

  69. parengtony says:

    Last portion of CdeQuiros’ column today:

    “And of course, a point that can never be sufficiently belabored, social media expands the possibilities of democracy. What is democracy without public participation? A democratic government isn’t just for the people, it is of and by the people. Social media functions not unlike the town square, or our very own Plaza Miranda—at least as Plaza Miranda used to be known—allowing public engagement of, or weighing in on, matters of importance to the nation. The fundamental criterion of the soundness of a law then was, “If you can defend it in Plaza Miranda, you can defend it anywhere.” Of course it made for excess too, of course it made for demagoguery too. You can’t always rein in the enthusiasm of people. But better to err on the side of toleration, or liberalism, than on that of restraint, or censorship. In freedom of expression more than others.

    If you can defend it in the social media, you can defend it anywhere.”

    Ms Raissa, I am sure so many are happy for you. Have a great day.

  70. Johnny Lin says:

    Corrupt Media?

    Read the Latest Inquirer column of Neal Cruz: “Pagcor caught in the middle of Okada Wynn rift”

    Pagcor is not caught in the middle of this rift. Pagcor is a govt controlled corporation giving license to applicants like Okada gambling empire without money exchange.

    In this article there are two obvious talking points and one missing important fact:

    First talking point is: bribery not needed because license have been issued in 2008.
    Second talking point is that the Okada million dollar payments were meant to buy Subic yacht club. In a corporation, plan to buy properties are spelled out in corporate strategies, planning and board meetings. Not coming out of the blue without documented minutes from corporate after questionable issuance of the checks. L

    What is missing in the Neal Cruz Article is the most important published in all newspapers before this column was published.

    That after the $5 million payment(bribe?) was issued, Pagcor thru GMA granted a corporate tax deduction to Okada corporation to maximize gambling profits, issued in March 2010, 3 months before she steps down from office and after appointing Genuino to another term as Pagcor chairman. Genuino resigned from that appointment after controversial GMA midnight appointments including chief justice came into light.

    I am not saying that Neal Cruz received money to talk favorably about Soriano, Genuino and company because they are not Pagcor. Senseless to involve Pagcor the corporation with the rift. Talking points by deflecting the issue along with avoidance of mentioning a bigger issue generate suspicion.

    Talking points plus deflection plus avoidance equals suspicion. Very simple!

    If I were the editor I would reject this column because it is not accurate with all the issues involved. And editors are supposed to be well read and informed on news printed in their newspapers.

    Now, check also the reporter who put out a talking point report that Cong Bagatsing, head of House of Representative investigating committtee seemed to be exonerating Genuino from being involved with the $35 million from Okada Universal corporation without any congressional hearing yet.

    • macspeed says:

      the root of all evil is money, the only way to have good media are for them to include prayers 5 times a day…thats the minimum requirement of God…

      • Rossi says:

        Really??

      • DaveofBacolod says:

        I get tired of the misconception/belief of this BS saying: “money is the root of all evil” (sometimes you can place power or any tangible/intangible noun here). Money and Power (Since these two are always mistaken to be the source of “all evil” whatever that means) are always intertwined and the least common denominator regarding the various social wrongs and injustices that we witness/experience everyday.

        But for now I’ll give my opinion regarding “money.” What is money? Most of us will say in a heart beat that it is a currency, coins/paper bills, gold/silver/other precious metals, used for purchases/bills. But we are forgetting the most essential description of money, it is a “medium” that we use to value services/goods that we either purchase or sell. In short money is simply a representation or a tangible object we humans invented for the sake of convenience regarding trade and commerce. That inherently it is an inanimate object, it is “morally neutral” and unless understood by those who use it (heck aliens might be living in a Utopian society, you know :) ) it can be useless like a piece of dirt.

        Having money is not “immoral”. Using it is not “immoral”. Even keeping it is not “immoral”. What is immoral is loving it to the point that the value of money is not important, but the value of “having” it is most important. That is the time when the “use” of money becomes the root of all evil. But why must we criticize money? It is amoral when misused (by misuse i mean ignorant of it) or not in use and therefore cannot generate evil.

        We must then turn our attention to us, humans. It is said that everyone has a goodness inside us (Hitler loved his dogs) and that we are vessels of unlimited potential. We possess intelligence,ambitions and goals. What makes us different from animals is that we govern ourselves according to the accepted norms of the society, in other words we have social ethics. We as humans therefore has the capability of diverging or following the standard or rules set by our society. These “rules” govern our behavior on how we should use tools around us for the benefit of the greater good.

        The problem starts when we use these tools to “cheat” society and let our ambition grow to the point that we will railroad every Values known to man in pursuit of our personal interest. Money is simply a tool used by corrupted individuals to access/amass/control power (another tool,though intangible, useful in society). That the individual him/herself is corrupted and has money does not make money evil per se, but the manner on how the individual obtains/uses money makes it tainted with evil. We must condemn the choice of the individual to be corrupted and in choosing so used a tool used by society in daily transactions.

        So we must not blame money since it is only a tool, a medium for commerce. But we should condemn societal corruption of inherent Values ( profit is a motivator for greed although profit itself is not That Bad). So next time we should condemn the behavior and the term should be like this: “too much love of money is a source of evil” with emphasis on the adjective “too much love”. (You see love is always considered good but placed in context it can be a powerful source of evil)

        • Polpot says:

          Actually, if we trace what purpose money serves and what reason people do evil and immoral things, you will find Freud’s ego at the bottom of it all. Egocentrism, too much self love, and the absence of other-orientedness is the reason why people want to be richer and richer, want more and more power.

          Maybe it is a good thing that Asian culture hone people to be collectivistic and not individualistic.

      • leona says:

        @macspeed…you mean “payors” 5 times a day?! as minimum. What’s the maximum? hahaha…

        • DaveofBacolod says:

          Dapat yung kumikita nang atleast 10% sa equity funds sa UITF’s xempre ngaun tiba2x ang UITF, 30% year on year :)

      • tristanism says:

        Actually it’s the LOVE OF MONEY that is the root of all evil.

    • Monty says:

      There seems to be an all out campaign by Soriano/Genuino to clear their names by paying off both media and politicians. I remember talking to a high ranking SBMA official last year and he mentioned that Genuino indeed bought the Subic Bay Yacht Club. I never heard Okada’s name come up and I’m pretty sure the Yacht Club was not worth $30m. Is there any way of checking who actually bought the club and for how much?

    • Rene-Ipil says:

      Johnny@9

      Yes. It is a squid tactic employed by Neal Cruz to mislead the public into believing that the matter is an Okada-Wynn fight. But the truth is that it is an issue between Universal/ Okada and the Philippine government involving tax exemptions as well as other benefits granted by GMA at the near-end of her regime. Okada spent about 30M USD to ensure the profitability of the firm and convince his partners to support him. But it was done at the expense of the Filipino people by depriving them of revenue tax – their lifeblood.

  71. Sarah says:

    I think it really has to start from the top down. In the corporate environment that I am currently working in, any dishonesty or fraud is frowned upon by the top management and a code of conduct is strictly enforced on everyone. The result is that everyone is reluctant to do the wrong thing because they know the consequences.

    BTW, Marites Vitug also has a good article on media ethics in Rappler.

  72. AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

    I really miss the Philippines FREE PRESS. I think Teodoro M. Locsin’s mag and staffwriters were the “cleanest” among the media during its time…. Locsin and Co. practised what it preached. That of being the foremost enemy of corruption, malfeasances and shennanigans in government and society. Its writers are incorruptible, apart from being heads and shoulders above the rest in terms of polished, grammatical, sensible, glistening prose. Topped by Locsin, Sr., they were Nick Joaquin, Greg Brilliantes, Napoleon Rama, Kerima Polotan, Wilfredo Nolledo, Felimon V. Tutay — and yeah, Jose F. Lacaba. How I wish the FREE PRESS and its stable of magical word-weavers were still all around. Lacaba — and Teddy Boy Locsin, Jr. — I think are the only remaining remnants of that group. Sigh. Kakamissed. :(

    • AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

      Correction: “Its writers are incorruptible…” s/b “Its writer were incorruptible…..”

    • chit navarro says:

      WE must belong tot eh same generation… :)
      I do miss Free Press and al the writers you mentioned – including Quijano de Manila – I do not remember anyore whose pen name that is.

      I ebg to disagree though that Teddy Boy Locsin jr. is one of the remaining remnants of the group – he belongs to Free Press, alright, but I do not believe he within the league of his father, et al.

      FREE PRESS – fair and balance in reporting the news…!

      We get that now in CPM – CyberPlaza Miranda…

      • I remember the old Locsin crossed swords and had a running battle
        with T Valencia. T Valencia’s grammar and writing skills were proved
        garbage. Is Teddy Boy a product of heredity or his environment?.

      • Vibora says:

        @chit navarro
        Quijano de Manila is Nicomedes “Nick” Joaquin.

        • AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

          You’re right, Vibora. QUIJANO DE MANILA was Nick Joaquin. I so admired Joaquin that in our office organ which I edited I used as one of my pseudonyms — QUIJANO DE SAN MATEO. Kapal ko, noh? ;)

      • AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

        Chit, thanks. When I “included” Teddy Boy in that August Group, I only meant he was already within the Philippines FREE PRESS although most prolly still a student. Once in a while I ran across his already well-written short pieces. OK, I grant that during the LocsinSr-Joaquin-Rama-Brilliantes-Polotan era, Teddy Boy did NOT belong yet. But he WAS already family, who I presume was already cutting his journalistic teeth in the background. Hehehe. Ok ba, Chit? You got another point: We belong to the same generation. And are both NOW members of the Tanders Club! A.K.A. Senior Citizen 20% Discount Club! YEBAHHHH!!! [That's ex-Manila Mayor Tony Villegas' famous battlecry, right?]

        • AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

          And speaking of Mayor Villegas, his anti-smoking slogan is still needed now, especially by our No. 1 Citizen: “DI DAHIL SA NAIS NA KAYO’Y PIGILIN, NGUNIT IYANG USOK AY MASAMANG HANGIN!” A slogan which we teeners then childishly revised and graffiti’d in jeeps to “DI DAHIL SA NAIS NA KAYO’Y PIGILIN, NGUNIT ANG UTOT AY MASAMANG HANGIN!” Hahahaha! Dem deys of yore! When we were fifteen, footloose and fancyfree. Aside from always having NO MONEY!” :(

        • chit navarro says:

          very true…. to the Senior Citizen Club and YEBBAH… I only wish I am a resident of Makati so I could enjoy free movies and get a birthday cake reminder…. :)

          and to Teddy Boy, well, he has remained a “BOY”… has not grown up really!
          during the time of President Cory, he wrote excellent speeches but when he netred politics, it’s a different story and somehow, this must have coloured his life’s lens….

          and on the question on “What can we do to minimize media corruption?”…
          we should not patronize newspapers whose opinion writers are perceived to be “on the take”, “Corrupt”, etc….. as netizen, we should start questioning their articles and expose their intentions to cover up or shut up…

          Social Media will play a major role in the coming elections… and newspaper owmers/publishers will soon feel the pinch with a reduction in readership.

          What about that idea then to come up with a group parallel to CPM that will be more active in creating awareness for truth this coming election? A group that is separate from Raissa’s blog so that her independence/neutrality is not compromised?

          • AUGUST C FERNANDO says:

            From CHIT: QUOTE… “we should not patronize newspapers whose opinion writers are perceived to be “on the take”, “Corrupt”, etc….” UNQUOTE.

            Done. I’ve long ago stopped buying/reading such papers as Manila Standard, Malaya, Tribune… TRIBUNE! HAHAHA! Halatang-halata!! I wonder how those broadsheets can go on publishing altho no one seem to buy them. Ano kayang sikwet nila? Wink. Wink.

            BTW, Chit I got something with Teddy Boy. I also have remained the “Boy” my family, closed friends and ex-colleagues call me. Talk of oxymoron! Tandang Boy! Hahaha! :)

  73. yeheywater says:

    @ Tomas Gomez III

    Visiting and commenting at online news report half an hour a day is not a big ask as well, I think

  74. Johnny Lin says:

    In media integrity and honesty begin with publishers and editors but buck stops with the reading public. Readers have to be savvy in reading or listening to interviewees. Bias reporter is easily spotted with the kind of questions posed to candidates. When the interviewee is given lots of leeways to explain his side and no follow up hard hitting questions, be suspicious in the interviewer.
    Example: when Karen Davila was interviewing Mayor Co on the Pagadian pyramid scam. Two times Davila asked her about the report he was receiving investors money and his answers were entirely unrelated to the question. He was making different explanation and Davila did not say, “you were not answering my question directly”. Same thing happened to Taberna when he interviewed Corona. He gave Corona time to explain without asking obvious follow up questions pinning him to explain source of his bank deposits.

    Among columnists, it’s easy to spot someone offering unsolicited explanation, explicit and implicitly favoring somebody in the limelight. Or a political columnist suddenly writing extensive “talking points” on the merits and hardships of a business entity. Not that the columnist is forbidden to do such thing, but very obvious that the explanation is one sided without interviewing the other party involved.

    Internet patrol may be the answer. Reading something in the news from reporters or columnists, post in Internet or Raissa’s blog and comment on the slanted report hoping someone honest and inquisitive might take a page out of it or becomes viral in social media. Like what we did on the interview with Bishop Arguelles calling for a catholic vote and tagging Pro RH advocates as “ethnic cleansers” or our stand on Cybercrime law and Sottonism.

    Netizens could be powerful guardians of honest media. 2013 election Netizen Watch must be front runner to educate voters against senatorial interlopers and greedy political dynasties like Enrile, Binay, Ejercito and Angara.

    • Rene-Ipil says:

      Johnny Lin@ 5

      Was it Anthony Taberna or Arnold Clavio or both? I think both even asked leading questions to Corona at the time that Corona was having a TV roadshow to condition the public’s mind immediately before he presented his defense during the impeachment trial.

      • Johnny Lin says:

        You are right but Taberna interviewed Corona twice or shall I say “relinquished his TV time slot to Corona”

        He he he

        • Rene-Ipil says:

          There was a compelling reason for Taberna to do that as an INC member. But as to Clavio, there were much more reasons. I am reminded of his interview of GMA who obviously picked him for the job at the time she was arrested for poll sabotage.

          • vander anievas says:

            the more Taberna should be on the guard of his comments, INCs are known to be more devoted to their belief and considering their faith superior over others. i think Mang Tonyo now had a twisted version of fairness. he is not anymore the hardhitting guy of dos por dos. kung kelan nagka-award saka nangurag…
            before i only listen to their program “dos por dos” in the early morning and early evening airings. but during TJ’s trial i found him often times out of balance. i was turned-off. no more dos por dos, since then. my reading of him is, he’s only granstanding in his program, got me boring.

      • raissa says:

        But you see, both reporters were among the very few that Corona allowed himself to be interviewed by.

        They did draw information that gave us insights about Corona. For instance, Arnold Clavio was able to draw form Corona the fact that he owned an arsenal :)

  75. Vibora says:

    It’s no wonder why people vote crook and corrupt politicians. Some people always blame the “masa” for electing bad people into office. I blame corrupt media for feeding the populace with corrupted news and lies.

    • Rene-Ipil says:

      Vibora@4

      The purpose of media is to tell the people what is truly happening in our country. Good and bad. But it seems that the news and opinions that the people get are those good for the pockets of the journalists and their benefactors. Without the money to grease the media machinery, conscientious and honest government officials are usually ignored, if not vilified, for them to come across.

      So, what information do the people usually receive from media? Those that are misleading, if not deceiving. In that case, overwhelming corrupt politicians are re-elected while the few honest politicians are replaced or removed from office by the voters who are either corrupt, clueless or deceived by media.

    • filipino_mom says:

      @vibora, i think that the bigger problem is that during election season, what’s being reported are news on personalities, not on the elections itself or the issues relevant to the elections. syempre, those who are artista, socialite, with connections are the ones who are in the news. and not just in the evening or national news, kasali na sa showbiz news saka “human interest” news.

      i wish that we could have debates just like the ones that they have in the recent US elections. focus on the issues, no-holds-barred para magkaalaman na talaga. have these shown in the town halls / gymnasiums tulad ng mga laban ni pacquiao (who is useless as a congressman, btw and a mysoginist, imho).

  76. zamera says:

    The social networking sites are not just for socializing and getting in touch with friends. Nowadays they are used by the ordinary mass to play Big Brother not just to high profile people but also to monitor what is actually going on. FB, Twitter, etc had become platforms of choice for information dissemination.

    Previously, we are just given the bird’s eye view based on how we get got the news, how it had been delivered, and what been delivered – it may or may not be the complete picture, or whether it was impartial or biased. Newspapers got opinion columns, and so are TV channels having news programs and commentary segments. Inevitably they are read and viewed, and more likely than not, from these we form our own opinion too – right or wrong :)

    Thanks to the internet, and social media, plus of course these lovely gadgets with cams, we are now getting the news and info almost always “from the ground”. ;) More realistic, oftentimes no holds barred exposure :)

  77. Art Montesa says:

    I don’t see anybody being able to stop or even put a dent on media practitioners who sell their souls to political trapos for many, many pieces of silver. But with social media like Facebook and Twitter, they can be exposed and put to shame. Not that that’s going to change things. What needs to change is the Mafia culture among Filipinos in general, especially politicians and anybody with access to money – to show off, to buy palaces, expensive cars and gadgets, to accumulate wealth like it’s going out of style, and even to kill if that kind of lifestyle is ever threatened. And if one does not have access to money, he can rob and kill.

    • Michelle says:

      It’s pure and simple malpractice. Media is in existence because they have credible scribes whom people have some kind of confidence in, that maybe there because of few choices available, and it is fair game to just be accepting of them.

      Media is actually a controlled commodity by the oligarchy, and they have absolute stranglehold on practically everything under the sun in the Philippines. So it is in their interest that media keep lying whenever they are asked to by their owners, the oligarchs!

  78. Tomas Gomez III says:

    Ang higit na nakararaming matitino sa ating media ay pawang mga babae……”the fairer sex.”. Isa na diyan si Aling Raissa….kabilang sila Maria Resa, Maritess Danguilan Vitug, Chay F. Hofilena and many, many others. Of course, there are male stalwarts also. We have got Vergel Santos, Alan Robles, Johnny Mercado etc.
    But the ladies are at the vanguard of taming and curbing the corruption in media not only by their professional behavior but by the courage with which they publicly air and discuss this hydra-headed menace to democracy. Sana dumami pa kayo. The fact that corruption in media was a bone to contend with during the last Media Nation conference in Tagaytay is a good sign. May pag-asa pa! Awareness among CPMers is encouraging. Consumers of news…..meaning, all of us, ought not be shy about airing our critical sentiments. What else can we do?……fellow CPMers, let us get to work!

    • raissa says:

      There are many, many more who are straight.

      But they just work quietly.

      • Johnny Lin says:

        Agreeably, many more honest journalists are around. However, newspaper publishers and editors also know the identities of the rotten ones.

        Who will spearhead media clean up? the top 3 widely circulated ones have owners whose credibility and integrity are not kosher? The shining knight might be the prominent incoming buyer but he is no business fool ending up like HP with Autonomy!

      • leona says:

        Raissa, how are journalists “policed or regulated” separately from other professions, as to their actions like lawyers they have the Integrated Bar of the Philippines [ IBP ], other professions by the Professional Regulation Commission [ PRC ] if there is such?

        If there is none, should journalists have it or be subject to it under Congress’ exercise of police powers, or free speech and of the press powers? Or other powers in the Constitution? The IBP I think is by the Judiciary power through the Supreme Court.

        • gayyem says:

          @leona, we used to have the NPC (National Press Club) whose job, I believe, is to “police, regulate and champion” journalists’ rights. I don’t read of it anymore, especially after the Maguindanao massacre. I wonder what happened to it?

          • raissa says:

            I’m supposed to be a lifetime member of NPC :)

            Haven’t attended any election for years.

            • JJ says:

              That could be one of the factors that made NPC silent for sometime. No attendance, No meetings, No elections,.. or No plans. ;)

              • Tomas Gomez III says:

                The utter deterioration of the National Press Club, both as an institution and as a venue for social/professional interaction is a story by itself. It has got to be told. Perhaps if Alan and/or Raissa can still find the time, that story need to be told. In any case, some enterprising journalist ought to and perhaps we can wish that that edifice (and what it stands for) overlooking the Pasig river can be revived. The deterioration of the NPC might be symbolic of corruption in media, as well. I first joined it in 1957. I was then with Manila Times Radio….when broadcast journalism was still an infant …..and so was I !!!

              • gayyem says:

                @JJ, in short, naging kanya-kanya or “divide and rule” na lang. No wonder, our country has gone to the dogs! Decades ago, when I was young, we took pride in our country being called “Pearl of the Orient Sea”. Then, in a matter of a few decades after, the calling changed for the worse: “sick man of Asia”, “hemorrhaging woman of Asia”, etc. I dread to see the day when it will be called “goat excrement (tae ng kambing) of Asia! This may not be far fetched because of dying institutions like the NPC which should have been a bulwark of responsible and truthful reporting for the country’s common good. The way it looks today, there seems to be no “common good.” It appears each person/institution/company has his own agenda to pursue whatever happens even to the point of bribing one’s way because he can always go to the confessional anytime and be given an absolution of his wrongdoing! I wish we had been ruled by the Japanese for a long time to have adopted their nationalistic discipline of doing a “harakiri” when exposed as having shamed their country!

              • DaveofBacolod says:

                @gayyem i would have preferred it if the Brits stayed after 1764. Although not that much better than the Spaniards regarding colonial governance, at least they disdain corruption and try to develop their colonies. They could have changed the culture of Filipino politics then by demanding accountability and responsibility. Instead we languished under 124 more years of Spanish decadence and the interference of the Catholic Chruch.

          • leona says:

            @gayyem…seppoko, a gory way of ending for shame, by the Japanese culture would have been ours too! As you wished they should have stayed longer here. Only Angelo Reyes did that so far. [RIP Angelo] No, the Japanese would still leave early our place as not many Pinoys would do seppoko! Many Pinoys would instead do Kawatwatako!

            @DaveofBacolod…the Brits you said you wished also to have stayed after 1764. If they did, on July 4, 1946 when they “left” we were shocked to find that they “carved out” our country into three: Luzon to China; Visayas to Malaysia and Mindanao to Indonesia! The Brits are fond of carving out territories after they leave it. Nothing for Pinoys!

            • DaveofBacolod says:

              @leona

              With regards to the Philippines I believe they will try to incorporate it within the Federation of Malaya. Although to think of it the term “Filipino” was non-existent until the 1896 Revolution. During that time the populace consider themselves belonging to a Regional Culture or a Provincial identity. We might be carved into three different countries but it won’t matter that much if it happened because carving out a National Identity is already hard during that time. The tyranny of the Spaniards forged the Nationalism of the Philippines and although the Brits are not saints themselves, you will see that in most of their former colonies, governments are stable and people has a sense of responsibility when given the opportunity to govern themselves.

      • Rene-Ipil says:

        Gayyem@1.1

        You wrote: “Decades ago, when I was young, we took pride in our country being called “Pearl of the Orient Sea”. Then, in a matter of a few decades after, the calling changed for the worse: “sick man of Asia”, “hemorrhaging woman of Asia”, etc.”

        What do you mean by etc.? To me it means “now, Philippines is the emerging tiger of Asia”. I am merely quoting economists and businessmen, local and abroad.

        • gayyem says:

          @Rene-Ipil. You asked “What do you mean by etc.?” I’ll give you two: 1. A country with a ‘damaged culture’; 2. A country with the most number of political dynasts. As for 1., here’s the link:

          http://schemers.us/culture/2005_11_01_archive.html

          http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/1987/11/a-damaged-culture-a-new-philippines/7414/

          For 2., what could be more convincing than a Vice-Pres. openly endorsing his daughter to run for Senator and Senate Pres. his son to run for Senator in the coming 2013 elections. In the provincial and town levels, it’s even worse. The endorsers are giving the excuse that it’s the people who are going to decide after all. By this line of thinking, it’s the Filipino electorate who are building political dynaties.

          • Rene-Ipil says:

            Gayyem@1.1

            Meaning that “etc.” includes only the negative sides of my beloved country, the Philippines. This is confirmed by your statement that “I dread to see the day when it will be called “goat excrement (tae ng kambing) of Asia!”, which statement forecloses any positive development about the country. Now, I understand how damaged our culture is, considering that you are a Filipino. Please correct me if I am wrong about you.

            I understand that a damaged culture is “a culture that pulls many Filipinos toward their most self-destructive, self-defeating worst”. Fallows wrote his article a generation ago right after Marcos regime while Rodis wrote about Fallows article shortly after GMA stole the presidency from FPJ. The 1987 “damaged culture” model of Fallows saw many, if not most, Filipinos wanting a change in nationality. Only a few days ago, Inquirer columnist Jose Montelibano wrote that our local citizens now do not envy anymore their “kababayan” in the US. The main reason is not economics but good governance.

            Probably, the Philippines would really be damaged if Binay became the next President with either Bongbong or Jinggoy as Vice President.

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